Did Someone Say Free?: Selected Free and Inexpensive Resources for K-12 Physical Education

By Matanin, Marcia J.; Longmuir, Gordon E. | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, October 1996 | Go to article overview

Did Someone Say Free?: Selected Free and Inexpensive Resources for K-12 Physical Education


Matanin, Marcia J., Longmuir, Gordon E., JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


Developing new curricular ideas and updating old ones can sometimes be an expensive project. Beginning teachers, especially, may not have the necessary information to accumulate free or inexpensive materials and incorporate these new ideas into their existing physical education curricula. Small or nonexistent budgets for public school physical education make it even more difficult to create innovative instruction units.

The purpose of this article is to provide physical education teachers with helpful information on curricular resources that can be obtained from various organizations free of charge or inexpensively. It is our hope that this information will give physical education teachers new ideas of how they can provide effective, high-quality instruction on a limited budget. In compiling this information, we reviewed journal articles, curricular resources solicited through the mail, and information distributed at state and national conventions. University physical education faculty and practicing K-12 physical education teachers were consulted as well.

We carefully examined all the products and materials included in this article for relevance to the K-12 physical education curriculum, quality of content, and reasonable cost ($30 or less). Only those materials that we deemed appropriate have been included. All addresses are listed in table 1.

We have classified these resources according to five categories: health-related fitness; individual and dual activities; team sports; publications, software, and videotapes; and other equipment and supplies.

Health-Related Fitness Activities

ALL BODIES SHOULD EXERCISE FOREVER (ABSEF): FITNESS FOR KIDS was developed by Renae Buss to teach elementary students about fitness. ABSEF is a complete physical fitness curriculum with lesson plans and activities for children in grades K-6. The teacher's manual includes goals and objectives, 20 lessons plans on nutrition and exercise activities, and student worksheets.

GRADES K-6 $17.95

Other items offered by ABSEF include colorful posters, character flash cards, student booklets, and handouts featuring a cuddly character. A complete price list and description of items can be obtained by contacting ABSEF.

GRADES K-6 $8.95 AND UP

THE AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EXERCISE provides in-depth information on fitness topics compiled by experts using the most up-to-date research findings. Brochures include Starting an Exercise Program, Exercise and Weight Control, Helping Kids Get Fit, Ace Fit Facts, and The Energy 2 Burn Elementary Program.

GRADES K-12 FREE

THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION (AHA) offers a program called Jump Rope for Heart at the elementary and secondary school levels. AHA supplies the school with 10 jump ropes, two sets of long ropes for double-dutch, posters, videos, games, and lesson plans. In return for these supplies, the school must commit to holding a Jump Rope for Heart event, where participating students collect pledges to raise money for AHA research. Students can earn prizes, and the school can earn points to order more free equipment.

Hoops for Heart is a similar event in which participants obtain donations to play basketball skill games or tournaments. AHA gives prizes to participants based upon the amount of money they raise. The event is designed primarily for middle and high school students, but anyone can participate. Hoops for Heart events can be tailored to various environments and skill levels.

AHA also offers many booklets related to nutrition and fitness. Nutrition for the Fitness Challenge (1983) discusses the importance of eating properly. The American Heart Association Diet (1991) includes an eating plan for healthy Americans. Walking for a Healthy Heart (1992) discusses the benefits of walking, explains how to get started, and includes an example of a beginning walking program. E Is for Exercise (1989) provides guidelines for exercising properly. …

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Did Someone Say Free?: Selected Free and Inexpensive Resources for K-12 Physical Education
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