Narcissus Enters the Apocalypse: Anthony Goicolea Earned a Legion of Fans and Collectors for His Homoerotic Photo Montages of Adolescent Boys at Play. When He Switched to Photographing Grim Landscapes and Family Narratives, Not Everyone Went Along

By Bentley, Kyle | The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine), October 21, 2008 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

Narcissus Enters the Apocalypse: Anthony Goicolea Earned a Legion of Fans and Collectors for His Homoerotic Photo Montages of Adolescent Boys at Play. When He Switched to Photographing Grim Landscapes and Family Narratives, Not Everyone Went Along


Bentley, Kyle, The Advocate (The national gay & lesbian newsmagazine)


IF EVERY FICTION BEGINS IN TRUTH, artist-photographer Anthony Goicolea's reality is his appearance. Goicolea, 37, first made his mark posing for his own photographs as young boys (and occasionally girls) behaving badly in various settings. The kids in his work would masturbate in a classroom, for instance, or one would spit in another's mouth or urinate on one another in a bathtub. The photographs looked as polished as an advertising campaign-Goicolea actually once made a 30-minute film for Thorn Browne's spring 2007 collection--but ambiguous enough to pass for art. They hit all the high notes-they were easy to look at, readily digestible, and appealed to our indulgence for budding sexuality and gender. Elton John bought 20 pieces.

But sometime around 2002 all that stopped. In one last flourish of self-absorption, the Cuban-American artist shot the "water series," in which he masqueraded as boys who appear to be at once drowning and in rapture. They must not have survived the water, because Goicolea immediately began taking landscape photographs instead. At first his new pieces were populated only by animals, though young men-not Goicolea-eventually crept back in, albeit dwarfed by their natural surroundings. Those images gave way by 2007, for the most part, to black-and-white industrial hallucinations dominated by smokestacks and power lines. Narcissus' pool had become slick with oil.

New Yorker critic Vince Aletti, a fan of the artist's multiple-Goicolea tableaux, says he wasn't sure how to relate to the apocalyptic photos. "I don't remember them that well," he says. "They don't cut very vividly to mind--and I missed the figures.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Narcissus Enters the Apocalypse: Anthony Goicolea Earned a Legion of Fans and Collectors for His Homoerotic Photo Montages of Adolescent Boys at Play. When He Switched to Photographing Grim Landscapes and Family Narratives, Not Everyone Went Along
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.