Books Received

China Review International, Fall 2007 | Go to article overview

Books Received


Amardeep Athwal. China-India Relations: Contemporary Dynamics. RoutledgeCurzon Taylor & Francis Group, 2008.

Bamo Ayi, Stevan Harrell, and Ma Lunzy, with a contribution by Bamo Qubumo. Fieldwork Connections: The Fabric of Ethnographic Collaboration in China and America. University of Washington Press, 2007.

Anthony J. Barbieri-Low. Artisans in Early Imperial China. University of Washington Press, 2007.

Marie-Claire Bergere. Capitalismes & Capitalistes en Chine: Des origines a nos jours. Perrin, 2007.

Robert Bickers and R. G. Tiedemann. The Boxers, China, and the World. Rowman & Littlefield, 2007.

Francesca Bray, Vera DorofeevaLichtmann, and Georges Metailie. Graphics and Text in the Production of Technical Knowledge in China: The Warp and the Weft. Brill Academic Publishers, 2007.

Jeremy Brown and Paul G. Pickowicz. Dilemmas of Victory: The Early Years of the People's Republic of China. Harvard University Press, 2007. Miranda Brown. The Politics of Mourning in Early China. State University of New York Press, 2007.

Zong-Qi Cai. How to Read Chinese Poetry: A Guided Anthology. Columbia University Press, 2008.

Steve Chan. China, the U.S., and the Power-Transition Theory: A Critique. RoutledgeCurzon Taylor & Francis Group, 2008.

Calvin Chen. Some Assembly Required: Work, Community, and Politics in China's Rural Enterprises. Harvard University Press, 2008.

Confucius; Burton Watson, translator. The Analects of Confucius. Columbia University Press, 2007.

Nicole Constable. Maid to Order in Hong Kong: Stories of Migrant Workers. Cornell University Press, 2007.

Robert Culp. Articulating Citizenship: Civic Education and Student Politics in Southeastern China, 1912-1940. Harvard University Press, 2007.

Gloria Davies. Worrying about China: The Language of Chinese Critical Inquiry. Harvard University Press, 2007.

Hilde De Weerdt. Competition over Content: Negotiating Standards for the Civil Service Examinations in Imperial China (1127-1279). Harvard University Press, 2007.

Alexander Des Forges. Mediasphere Shanghai: The Aesthetics of Cultural Production. University of Hawai'i Press, 2007.

Nara Dillonand Jean C. Oi. At the Crossroads of Empires: Middlemen, Social Networks, and State-Building in Republican Shanghai. Stanford University Press, 2007.

Stephanie Hemelryk Donald and John G. Gammack. Tourism and the Branded City: Film and Identity on the Pacific Rim. Ashgate Publishing, 2007.

Louise Edwards. Gender, Politics, and Democracy: Women's Suffrage in China. Stanford University Press, 2008.

Eugene Chen Eoyang. Two-Way Mirrors: Cross-Cultural Studies in Glocalization. Rownman & Littlefield, 2007.

Andrew S. Erickson, Lyle J. Goldstein, William S. Murray, and Andrew R. Wilson. China's Future Nuclear Submarine Force. U.S. Naval Institute, 2007.

Harriet Evans. The Subject of Gender: Daughters and Mothers in Urban China. Rowman & Littlefield, 2007.

Wang Feng. Boundaries and Categories: Rising Inequality in Post-Socialist Urban China. Stanford University Press, 2007.

Antonia Finnane. Changing Clothes in China: Fashion, History, Nation. Columbia University Press, 2008.

Merle Goldman. Political Rights in Post-Mao China. Association for Asian Studies, 2007.

Leonard H. D. Gordon. Confrontation Over Taiwan: Nineteenth-Century China and the Powers. Rowman & Littlefield, 2007.

Richard Gotshalk. The Classic of Way and Her Power: A Miscellany? University Press of America, 2007.

Jamie Greenbaum. Chen Jiru (1558-1639): The Background to, Development and Subsequent Uses of Literary Personae. Brill Academic Publishers, 2007.

Linda Grove. A Chinese Economic Revolution: Rural Entrepreneurship in the Twentieth Century. Rowman & Littlefield, 2006.

Kenneth J. …

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