Nandalal Bose: Philadelphia Museum of Art

By Citron, Beth | Artforum International, November 2008 | Go to article overview

Nandalal Bose: Philadelphia Museum of Art


Citron, Beth, Artforum International


WITH THE RECENT EXPLOSION of Indian art onto the global stage, sweeping survey exhibitions of work from modern and contemporary South Asia are regularly appearing throughout the world--only to provide reductive histories of this region. By contrast, "Rhythms of India: The Art of Nandalal Bose (1882-1966)" presents a detailed, elegant meditation on just one artist's life and career. Yet this consideration of Bose--the first comprehensive retrospective in North America on the "father" of modern Indian art--gives audiences a great sense of how the shifting character of India's art during the twentieth century mirrored the country's momentous path to independence, which it achieved in 1947. Indeed, as organized by the San Diego Museum of Art's Sonya Rhie Quintanilla and reinstalled by the Philadelphia Museum of Art's Darielle Mason, this chronicle of Bose's wide-ranging stylistic experimentations and poetic integrations of tradition and modernity foregrounds trends and issues still engaged by the country's artists today.

The show, divided into six roughly chronological sections, begins in 1905, at the start of the anticolonialist Swadeshi ("of the land") movement. Intellectuals in Calcutta were at the time proposing to unify India through self-reliance and indigenism; art became a political tool for the nationalist campaign, with Swadeshi artists like Bose (along with visionary teacher Abanindranath Tagore and Bose's classmate Asit Kumar Haldar) seeking to regenerate the country's art by embracing motifs for a new national identity. These artists thus turned away from oil painting and European realism, instead reviving highlights from India's traditional art history, especially Mughal miniature paintings and the ancient Ajanta murals, rediscovered in the nineteenth century and considered the apogee of Indic culture. One of Bose's most famous works, Sati, 1907/1943, implemented the wash technique favored by the movement: The painting depicts the self-immolation of Sati, wife of the Hindu god Shiva, with a spiritual sensibility then praised as authentically Indian. While the piece was rooted in religion, its secular representation and embodiment of individualism also had a modern appeal.

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The most compelling section of "Rhythms of India," however, considers Bose's close relationship with Mahatma Gandhi. The canonical black-and-white linocut print Dandi March (Bapuji), 1930, depicts the leader's 240-mile journey to defy a British tax on salt--one of the iconic actions of the freedom movement. Bose was the only artist ever patronized by Gandhi--who often claimed that he had no time for art--and this fact is especially poignant because Bose's work was never overtly political. Instead, his practice embodied Gandhian ideals through harmonious evocations of nature and village life, the exploration of artisan traditions, and the integration of folk arts with modern ideas. While Bose's early renown had been largely contained within Bengal's elite intellectual community, this section illustrates how Gandhi's sponsorship in the 1930s catapulted Bose to national fame, and, one should also note, through prohibitive class divisions. …

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