Careers in the Electronics Industry

By Herbert, Solomon J. | Diversity Employers, October 1996 | Go to article overview

Careers in the Electronics Industry


Herbert, Solomon J., Diversity Employers


Over the past few years, the job prospects for technical people have been soft at best, and disastrous at worst, depending on the view assessed. With the aerospace industry all but drying up, displacing tens of thousands of seasoned engineers and scientists in the process, it's understandable why many high school and college students who set their hearts on careers in engineering were having second thoughts.

The good news is that those who chose electronics stuck it out, and are now nearing graduation. They will find a robust but not fully recovered job market, one that offers many and varied opportunities for the right candidates.

Astute students able to wade through the avalanche of "information super highway" public relations hype will discover that there are indeed work opportunities for those with the right kinds of technical skills and training.

"I would say that overall, if you work in electronics, information and computers, the opportunities - well, it's like a gold rush, "exclaims George Davis, Vice President of West Coast Operations for Keystone Communications, the giant satellite transmission provider for domestic and international programmers, cable networks and sportscasters. "I think it's wide open. Not wide open in the traditional sense where people like Northrop are just going to be hiring 100,000 engineers as fast as the schools can churn them out, but opportunities are available, Davis insists.

Billy Dexter, manager University Relations for Motorola Land Mobile Products Sector, concurs. "I can speak from the wireless communications perspectives. In terms of the industry that Motorola is in as it relates to telecommunications and all that, career opportunities are outstanding," reports Dexter. "Wireless communications is a field growing tremendously, particularly in the areas of software development, where theory software develops, where there are lots of opportunities for electrical engineers," he says.

As Dexter sees it, the three main disciplines that fall under the general umbrella of the electronics industry are electrical engineering, computer engineering, and computer science.

While he concedes that computer engineering tends to be more hardware oriented, and computer science more focused on software development, Dick Ellis, director of Research for the American Association of Engineering Societies, feels the division between all three disciplines has become "very fuzzy."

It's partly a matter of local turf and how it's divided among warring academic departments," claims Ellis. "Some people use these terms and some don't. So we caution students when looking at this area that if they want to get a take on it, what they have to do is look at computer science, computer engineering and electrical engineering all combined."

According to Ellis, there are a number of distinct and degreed subfields within these three general disciplines that you may specialize in. These include control engineering, for instance, which is used to control feedback systems. An elementary example of a central system is your typical thermostat.

"Communications engineering is another one," Ellis adds, "dealing with general communications systems like radio, antenna development, which is sometimes classified as a radiation system, meaning microwave radiation. Circuits and systems is another recurring specialty we get. Solid State electronics is another, that whole field of chip development - that's effectively molecular engineering."

Another possibility, Ellis notes, is the arena of engineering technology, a four-year degreed discipline that has a whole range of similarly subdivided fields, including electromechanical, an area that deals with a combination of electrical and mechanical devises. On the downside, says Ellis, "engineering technology doesn't have the kind of salary track attached to it that engineering does, though the starting salaries are very close to those in engineering. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Careers in the Electronics Industry
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.