Do Sea Turtles Stop and Ask for Directions?

By Monastersky, Richard | Science News, November 30, 1996 | Go to article overview

Do Sea Turtles Stop and Ask for Directions?


Monastersky, Richard, Science News


Sea turtles navigating the Pacific Ocean follow the same narrow routes from year to year, as if they were migrating along thin ribbons of highway stretched out across the open ocean. This discovery, made by attaching satellite transmitters to leatherback turtles, may help scientists devise more effective strategies for preserving the dwindling populations of leatherbacks and other endangered turtles.

"Our perceptions are that the oceans are a vast, almost infinite resource. But the turtles are showing us that the resources are clustered along narrow, tight bands," says Stephen J. Morreale of Cornell University. Morreale and his colleagues identified the migratory routes by tracking eight female leatherbacks after they left their nesting site on the west coast of Costa Rica. The scientists describe their findings in the Nov. 28 Nature.

Each year from 1992 through 1995, Morreale's group studied two turtles for up to 3 months. All eight followed similar, in some cases identical, courses toward the Galapagos Islands. Even turtles traveling 3 years apart maintained the same route.

The migration path appears to go beyond the Galapagos for a distance of at least 2,700 kilometers, according to the longest-lived transmitter, which lasted 87 days.

Propelled by the dire situation of sea turtles around the world, researchers have redoubled their efforts to collect data on the behavior and biology of these holdovers from the days of the dinosaurs. Almost all of the information gleaned so far has concerned females engaged in laying eggs, because that is the only time that scientists can easily observe turtles, says Morreale. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Do Sea Turtles Stop and Ask for Directions?
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.