Commerce Dept. Confirms TKS Should Face Hefty Antidumping Duties

By Rosenberg, Jim | Editor & Publisher, November 20, 2008 | Go to article overview

Commerce Dept. Confirms TKS Should Face Hefty Antidumping Duties


Rosenberg, Jim, Editor & Publisher


The U.S. Commerce Department's International Trade Administration has confirmed its preliminary finding of two years ago that Japanese makers of large newspaper printing presses should be subject to anti-dumping duties.

As reported in the Federal Register late last week, the department determined that, "had the antidumping duty order not been revoked in the 2002 Sunset Review, revocation of the antidumping duty order on LNPP from Japan would have likely led to continuation or recurrence of dumping."

A lawyer for TKS and a spokesman for Goss had no comment on the determination.

The decision follows the reopening of an investigation of Tokyo Kikai Seisakusho Ltd. after Goss International Corp. demonstrated in a 2003 lawsuit that TKS sold equipment at less than fair value.

The lawsuit was brought after Goss successfully petitioned the Commerce Department to examine the U.S. sales practices of two German and two Japanese competitors. The department found that those competitors had dumped presses in this country; the U.S. International Trade Commission subsequently found that the dumping had harmed Goss; and antidumping duties were imposed.

The duties eventually expired after the government was satisfied that no further dumping had occurred. But evidence from Goss' suit showed that TKS had misled the government during its review prior to the duties' expiry.

Commerce Department reconsideration was sidetracked from Washington to New York when TKS took the matter before the U.S. Court of International Trade. That court disallowed reconsideration, but a federal appeals court said otherwise last June and the review proceeded.

It is now again up to the International Trade Commission to impose antidumping duties, which the Commerce Department calculated at almost 52% against TKS.

Duties are imposed on imports of pertinent goods from another country on behalf of the same U.S. industry. In the case of large newspaper presses, Goss was the U.S. industry, and the Japanese industry also included Mitsubishi Heavy Industries and another company on both of which the department calculated higher duties. Mitsubishi's sale to the Washington Post sparked Goss' initial petition in the mid-1990s but the sale later was exempted from penalty upon request by Goss. Mitsubishi sales in this country did not resume until after they were no longer subject to antidumping duties. The other Japanese manufacturer has had no U.S. sales.

Goss had sued the same four overseas competitors originally investigated by the Commerce Department. Three of those press makers settled before going to trial. The law under which Goss brought the suit was later revoked by Congress after the World Trade Organization determined that the nature of its penalty provisions contravened U.S. treaty obligations.

The U.S. District Court verdict, damages of which were trebled by law to almost $32 million, was upheld on appeal. But, after awaiting a determination by the World Trade Organization, Japan enacted its Special Measures Act - so-called clawback legislation that allows it to compensate TKS for the loss in U.S. court by claiming an equal amount from Goss' Japanese interests. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Commerce Dept. Confirms TKS Should Face Hefty Antidumping Duties
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.