A New World Awaited; Interview Adventure Was Easy to Come by in the 17th Century

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), November 29, 2008 | Go to article overview

A New World Awaited; Interview Adventure Was Easy to Come by in the 17th Century


Byline: Laura Davis reports

AWAY from the comfort of their lavish drawing rooms, the women set off into the unknown in carriages loaded with crockery sets and small items of furniture.

Their ears ringing with the newly penned tune to Rule Britannia, these adventurous souls, unable to imagine a journey without their best china, prepared themselves for the startling scenes they would witness.

The destination - not the darkest jungles of Africa or the frozen Canadian wastelands, but the savage lands of the provinces where, they imagined, barefoot peasants skulked like primitives.

In the 17th and 18th centuries you didn't have to travel far to seek adventure. Road conditions were poor, long journeys rare and travelling to the North from their country homes and London townhouses was a voyage into the exotic.

"These women didn't have to travel very far to realise that actually there were people who were very different from them," explains Zoe Kinsley, author of the new academic text Women Writing the Home Tour, 1682-1812.

"These days we don't consider any part of Britain as being really foreign but then to travel into the Highlands of Scotland was genuinely quite a new thing to do.

You could travel 50 miles and experience something that was completely unfamiliar to you."

Until 1707, Scotland and England (already joined with Wales) were ruled separately. The Act of Union, combined with Great Britain's growing status as one of the most powerful empires in history, sparked a revived sense of patriotism that was reflected in the writing and painting of the period.

People were suddenly keen to explore their own country, and women, who were not encouraged to follow the Grand Tour of Europe, seen as crucial to a young gentleman's education, saw an opportunity.

So off they went in their carriages, usually accompanied by a family group but occasionally with just a servant or two for company, armed with Samuel Johnson's account of his tour to Scotland as if it were a Lonely Planet travel guide.

There was plenty for them to record in their journals.

Dorothy Richardson, who ventured across the border from her home in Yorkshire, was alarmed by the "uncivilised" Lancashire natives.

Current Warrington residents may be dismayed to discover that she wrote of their forefathers: "The dirtiness of the people here exceeds what I could have believed in any part of this kingdom."

Dorothy was not alone in describing those she came across as barbaric.

Another traveller, Mary Morgan, compared miners in South Wales to South American Indians: "The miners sit upon their hands as the Indians do. In Byron's voyage there is a print of what he calls a whigwham or Indian hut, which will give you a perfect idea of these habitations; and the people, except that they are clothed, bear a strong resemblance to the natives of Terra del Fuego."

Zoe, a senior lecturer in English Literature, at Liverpool Hope University, believes the women travellers used these comparisons because they had no other way of describing what they saw.

"I think what you find is that they're talking about people who, through class, are very different from them and I think this rhetoric of savagery is often a way of giving expression to experiencing a working class that they perhaps haven't experienced at very close hand before," she says. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

A New World Awaited; Interview Adventure Was Easy to Come by in the 17th Century
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.