Special Olympics International Board of Directors Announces New Members

Palaestra, Spring 2008 | Go to article overview

Special Olympics International Board of Directors Announces New Members


Special Olympics International has appointed three new members to its Board of Directors, including an Olympic gold medalist, a prominent lawyer, and the President of the Special Olympics East Asia region.

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The New Board Members

Greg Craig is a trial lawyer who has successfully defended individuals and entities in a number of high-profile criminal and civil proceedings. Craig is Vice Chairman of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. In 1997, U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright appointed Craig to be one of her senior advisors, and he served the Secretary as her Director of Policy Planning from 1997 to 1998. For five years (1984-88), he served as Senator Edward Kennedy's Senior Advisor on Defense, Foreign Policy, and National Security issues.

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Donna DeVarona, Olympic swimmer and gold medalist, rejoins the International Board of Directors and is currently serving as a member of the Sports sub-committee of the New York City Urban Initiative Advisory Committee, charged with developing and delivering innovative urban programs that will accelerate growth, increase awareness, and enhance the overall penetration of Special Olympics in New York City. DeVarona also served on the Board of Directors for the 1995 Special Olympics World Summer Games in Connecticut. As an Olympic athlete, DeVarona was the youngest swimmer to compete at the 1960 Summer Olympics, and in the 1964 Olympics she won gold medals in the 400 m individual medley and as a member of the 400 m freestyle relay. During her career, she set 18 different swimming records before retiring shortly after the 1964 Olympics. DeVarona has been a significant and powerful force in the fight for equal rights for women. She broke a gender barrier in 1965 when she signed a contract with ABC and became the first female sportscaster in television history. She was also a political activist in favor of the Title IX entitlement program and helped to establish the Women's Sports Foundation, where she served as their first President from 1976 to 1984. …

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Special Olympics International Board of Directors Announces New Members
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