Workshop Tackles Issues of 'New Federalism.'(1996 National League of Cities Congress of Cities)

By Borgus, Heather | Nation's Cities Weekly, December 23, 1996 | Go to article overview

Workshop Tackles Issues of 'New Federalism.'(1996 National League of Cities Congress of Cities)


Borgus, Heather, Nation's Cities Weekly


"The choices that are being made today are going to have immense consequences in all the cities across this nation" said Lucy Allen, Mayor of Louisburg, NC at the Sunday workshop session entitled "Which Way State and Local Government.'

This workshop, held during the National league of Cities Congress of Cities Congress of Cities in San Antonio, Tex., was the first in a special series focusing on changing governance. All of the sessions in this series were moderated by NLC Past President Charles Royer, director of America's Promise, to provide connections from one session to another on the probable changes, pressure points and potentials that are likely to arise in the current climate of examining government roles and responsibilities.

"What big changes are coming down the road, not only from the federal government but from technology and from regulatory change"' asked Royer of the audience. "How will all of this affect our communities and what do we do about it?'

Entering 1997, state government is in the best fiscal shape it has been in in ten years, but we can be certain that it will not last was the consensus of those assembled.

The panelists, consisting of Lucy Allen, Mayor, Louisburg, N.C.; Hal Hovey, President State Policy Research, Inc., Columbus, Ohio; Walter Kelly, Town Council President, Fishers, IN; Michael Hightower, Commissioner, Fulton County, Ga.; and Rodney Ellis, State Senator, Houston, Tex., provided a personal perspective of how these federal changes will affect local governments.

The relationship between American governments and their constituents has always involved a dynamic process of change, but the current time period seems to be a period in which change is particularly rapid with major implications for local governments.

Quite simply, what happens at the national level does have an impact on every community across the country as well as with every citizen. As the federal government reduces its deficit and national debt, there are fewer dollars to support local programs. And, as the federal government reduces its role in some programs, such as welfare and housing, the needs do not disappear. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Workshop Tackles Issues of 'New Federalism.'(1996 National League of Cities Congress of Cities)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.