Mosley Wins Case over Nazi Orgy Claim

Manila Bulletin, July 26, 2008 | Go to article overview

Mosley Wins Case over Nazi Orgy Claim


Mosley, president of the FIA (Federation Internationale de l'Automobile) and son of 1930s British fascist leader Sir Oswald Mosley, was awarded 60,000 pounds (120,000 dollars, 76,000 euros) in damages against News Group Newspapers, owners of the News of the World tabloid which published the story.

He said the judgement had ''nailed the Nazi lie'' with which the top-selling Sunday newspaper had tried to justify its ''disgraceful intrusion''.

Mosley admitted paying five women for the sex session but denied there was a Nazi theme, saying the session in March centred on a prison fantasy.

Judge David Eady agreed that there had been ''no evidence'' of Nazi-style behaviour, adding Mosley's involvement in the session did not justify such an intrusion into his private life.

''There was bondage, beating and domination which seem to be typical of S and M behaviour,'' the judge said in his ruling.

''But there was no public interest or other justification for the clandestine recording, for the publication of the resulting information... all of this on a massive scale.''

The judge added that Mosley was ''hardly exaggerating when he says that his life was ruined'' by the story. The FIA boss's wife of 48 years, Jean, and their two adult sons knew nothing of his unusual sexual tastes.

Mosley, who fought off attempts to have him removed as FIA head in the wake of the revelations, showed no emotion as the ruling was handed down.

He had told the court that, because of his family background, he could think of ''few things more unerotic than Nazi role-play''.

During the five-hour S and M session in a flat in plush Chelsea, southwest London, Mosley, 68, was chained up and subjected to a mock medical examination, including a check for lice.

One of the women caned Mosley 21 times, drawing blood and necessitating a plaster on his bottom.

Later, Mosley punished three of the women -- all of whom were dressed in striped uniforms -- with a strap while speaking German to another woman who was playing the role of a prison guard.

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