Like a True Winner in Her Last SoNA

Manila Bulletin, July 31, 2008 | Go to article overview

Like a True Winner in Her Last SoNA


That's the number of times that audiences in the throng that crowded the immense session hall of the House of Representatives applauded President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo during her 55 minutes State of the Nation Address last Monday.

It was a joint session of Congress and the assemblage of lawmakers was joined by Cabinet Members and official guests, including those from the diplomatic corps, foreign and local business, government officials, and other personages.

From their responses to the President's presentation of her report, there was no room for doubt about the enthusiasm and interest of the audience in what she was saying.

Parenthetically, last Monday's SoNA was a day to remember in Philippine Congress history: It was the 72nd anniversary of the State of the Nation Address in the country having been delivered for the first time by President Manuel L. Quezon on June 16, 1936. The State-of-the-Nation Address which is a provision in the Philippine Constitution (Art. 7, Sec. 23) is a carry over from the United States Constitution when the country was under the US as a colony. Actually, it originated from the United Kingdom's "Speech from the Throne."

President Arroyo, sounding like a true winner in her style of leadership talked about the tough choices that had to be made, and she thanked God and the people for the right decision she had reached.

"My responsibility as President," she said, "is to take care to solve the problems we are facing now and to provide a vision and direction for how our nation should advance in the future."

She cited one by one what she considered her most significant successes during the year and in all of them the audience interacted with hearty cheers and acknowledgment.

It is in the midst of all these mutual exchanges and reciprocity between the President and her public that protest rallies in the streets and the hate messages by some sectors of society against Gloria Arroyo seemed swaggering and arrogant. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Like a True Winner in Her Last SoNA
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.