Taking a Cognitive View of Recruitment Policy

The Birmingham Post (England), December 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Taking a Cognitive View of Recruitment Policy


Byline: ANNA BLACKABY Creative Industries Editor

The head of a rapidly-expanding Midland marketing and communications agency is making the most of his cognitive psychology expertise to put the right team in place at the firm.

Since June Leamington-based Cognition has enjoyed buoyant trading and has taken on several new members of staff to cope.

The firm, which just celebrated its tenth birthday, added four new staff, with the latest Jennifer Ludford, appointed PR manager.

The firm's managing partner Dr Hughes has a background in cognitive psychology which he believes has helped build a stable, profitable company.

He said "Cognitive psychology looks at how people think, learn and store information.

It helped me make wise recruitment choices and I believe that having the right team is what makes Cognition such a success."

Dr Hughes explained how he applies his psychology training in the recruitment process.

"When I interview, I take professional skill as a given or as something that can be learnt," he said.

"Instead, I'll profile the candidate - without using psychometric tests - to help them to understand themselves and what they want.

"The effect is often dramatic and has led successful and unsuccessful candidates to understand their personal priorities and career choices in new ways.

"What I look for are candidates who are flexible in their behaviour and who can adapt quickly to any environment and the people they find in it.

"Typically, if a person uses phrases like "I should have", "He makes me feel bad", or "It's their fault", it shows inflexibility and they won't be working at Cognition. …

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