Multilingualism : English Becoming Dominant in Education

European Social Policy, December 8, 2008 | Go to article overview

Multilingualism : English Becoming Dominant in Education


English is the most commonly learnt language in virtually all out of 31 European countries studied. It is mandatory in 13 other European countries, according to a new report by the Eurydice Network, the EU's information network on education. The Eurydice report examines language teaching from primary to secondary general education in the 31 countries taking part in the EU's Lifelong Learning programme(1). Although showing a growing support for language learning in general education, with more learning of a foreign language at an early age, the report does pinpoint a growing shift towards English.

FRENCH AND GERMAN ALSO FAVOURED

In 13 European countries, the Eurydice report notes, English is the mandatory first foreign language. Even if given a choice, pupils and their parents tend to favour English. The lingua franca is now learnt by 90% of all European pupils at some stage of their compulsory education, making it by far the most widely taught language in primary education. When a second foreign language is taught, French and German are favoured. The report further notes that all pupils are obliged to learn a minimum of one foreign language at least up to the end of compulsoryaeducation, except in Italy and the United Kingdom (Welsh is not considered a foreign language in Wales, nor Irish in Ireland). In the United Kingdom, schools have a duty toaoffer a foreign language, even if pupils are under no obligation to learn one.

On the other hand, in non-English speaking countries, reforms are making foreign language learning compulsory at an earlier age, even if the time taught in primary education is limited. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Multilingualism : English Becoming Dominant in Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.