1st Data Tracks Consumer Behavior in Venture Enlisting Bank Partners

By Quittner, Jeremy | American Banker, January 16, 1997 | Go to article overview

1st Data Tracks Consumer Behavior in Venture Enlisting Bank Partners


Quittner, Jeremy, American Banker


First Data Corp. is making a bid to become a key source of information on consumer shopping behavior - with banks involved as partners in the venture.

Tapping the vast store of data from its credit card processing activities, First Data plans to offer retailers insights into consumer choices, while participating cardholders are rewarded with discounts.

The program, USA Value Exchange or Usave, has been in a pilot mode since last May and will go national this quarter, First Data announced this week at the National Retail Federation convention in New York.

First Data described the venture as a limited partnership with its card-issuing and merchant-acquiring banks. The banks remain in control of customer relationships, and the Hackensack, N.J., processing specialist manages the information.

Although the focus is on retail shopping habits, the strategy is similar to the data warehousing and data mining efforts of financial institutions to understand customers and their profitability - even predicting their needs or desires.

Industry observers characterized Usave as a powerful offering unifying the card-issuing and merchant-processing sides of First Data's business. (The company is the biggest in both ends of the bank card servicing industry.)

The venture's high degree of "customer intimacy" may raise privacy concerns. First Data said it adheres to a strict privacy code and lets cardholders opt out of the program. It hopes the payoff - discounts delivered with card statements - will keep cardholders in.

"People are tired of junk mail and mass marketing," said Patricia Hudson, president of Porges/Hudson Marketing Inc., San Francisco. "First Data is in a position to recognize specific cardholder transactions and therefore tailor these kinds of offers to" cardholders uniquely.

Mary K. Dobbs, president of USA Value Exchange Corp., the Houston-based venture managed by First Data Solutions of Palo Alto, Calif., said Usave would be "the next step beyond cobranding."

"It benefits consumers and the merchant and the banks on both sides of the equation," she said. "We can target every aspect of the consumer's behavior."

Ms. Dobbs said cardholder response rates have been greater than those to direct-mail offers. She said more than 50% of cardholders in the program said they would prefer to use credit cards to get discounts rather than make payments with cash or checks.

To be eligible for Usave, merchants must have a card processing relationship with First Data. They can use Usave to target potential customers as well as those who have already bought from the stores.

A bank must put at least 75% of its card portfolio into the program. But it can brand the program in any way, without necessarily calling it Usave.

Forty-eight financial institutions, 60 million cardholders, and 600,000 merchant locations currently participate. The program has accumulated 15 months of consumer spending data.

"The early read from merchants is that they are highly receptive and excited," said David Kerstein, executive vice president of Old Kent Financial Corp., Grand Rapids, Mich., a banking company represented on the USA Value Exchange board.

Others represented include Advanta Corp. …

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1st Data Tracks Consumer Behavior in Venture Enlisting Bank Partners
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