Looking for Child Care? Ask Questions, Observe

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), November 20, 2008 | Go to article overview

Looking for Child Care? Ask Questions, Observe


Byline: YOUR HEATLH By Todd Huffman For The Register-Guard

What is "the best" child care? The best child care promotes a child's healthy development in a safe, nurturing environment, where parents are involved and caregivers receive ongoing training and support.

A caregiver with training in child development is the main ingredient in quality child care. To keep the most qualified people in the field, parents should expect a child care provider to be paid commensurate with their education and training.

The best child care environments have plenty of space and equipment for learning, for indoor and outdoor activities, and for rest.

The best family child care providers operate as small businesses and follow state regulations.

The best child care centers have enough qualified staff for your child to receive quality individual attention. They offer their staff competitive wages and benefits, as well as continuing education. They should be state-certified, meeting state health and safety requirements, and carry insurance.

Family child care is child care offered in the home of the caregiver. Oregon law requires only that they be registered with the state Child Care Division if the caregiver cares for more than three children, or for children from more than one family.

Family child care operations may care for up to 10 children, but only six may be younger than 6 years of age, and only two younger than 2 years of age. Family homes are not inspected by the state.

What are child care centers? These are full- or part-time programs, certified as passing state health and safety inspections, and as maintaining specific ratios of staff to children. The s

taff is also checked for prior criminal and child abuse records.

You can call the Oregon State Child Care Division toll-free at (800) 556-6616 to check on a child care center's certification status.

What sorts of things should you look for when you visit a child care site?

The caregiver should be interested in your child and in the child's needs, routines, likes and dislikes; be warm and responsive to children; talk to each child calmly and respectfully with eye contact; and appear organized, relaxed, calm and emotionally engaged.

The children should appear happy, relaxed and involved in activities appropriate for their age. They should appear to feel safe and secure, and should be receiving lots of individual attention. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Looking for Child Care? Ask Questions, Observe
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.