Correctional Services Corporation and New York's Community Corrections Forging Concrete Partnerships

Nation's Cities Weekly, January 20, 1997 | Go to article overview

Correctional Services Corporation and New York's Community Corrections Forging Concrete Partnerships


Seven years ago, the Federal Bureau of Prisons contracted a private company to run a Brooklyn community correctional facility and secured a working partnership between the public and private sectors. The results has been to impart a measure of stability to a once troubled urban community.

The Brooklyn Community Correctional Center, located in the heart of Brooklyn in the Bed-ford-Stuyvessant area, is owned and managed by Correctional Services Corporation (CSC). A facility of ninety-five beds, it services offenders from the New York Department of Corrections and the Federal Bureau of Prisons. Residents include offenders who are within six months of their release date, as well as direct court commitments, probationers, supervised and mandatory releases, parolees and pretrial individuals. Many have chemical addictions. All are residents of New York. With a vital presence in a vital urban locale, CSC operates under the premise that its primary responsibility lies in investing in the facility's residents to the profit of their New York communities.

CSC's correctional programs are designed to reduce recidivism rates by delivering quality programs and reintegrating individuals with their communities as healthy, productive and upstanding citizens. Upon release from the Brooklyn Community Correctional Center, 95 percent of offenders take on upwardly mobile, stable and permanent profession& CSC's success in cultivating career paths for offenders is a testament to the company's reform methodology: rehabilitation must be a community effort, one that draws on individual resources while grounding residents in a public context of work, family and responsibility.

The alliance between public correctional agencies and the private corrections industry involves a congregation of diverse resources. CSC draws on the methods and philosophies employed by national correctional associations, the American Psychological Association, the Department of Education, the National Institute of Health's Center for Substance Abuse Treatment and state legislatures, among others. Among the Company's greatest strengths is the network of ties it has to business and industry leaders, community organizations and educational institutions, all of which serve the individual needs and professional goals of CSC's residents.

An integral factor of CSC's Brooklyn facility is a community advisory board, made up of local private citizens, that meets monthly to discuss plans for the future of the facility, as well as proposals for the facility's role in the community. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Correctional Services Corporation and New York's Community Corrections Forging Concrete Partnerships
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.