Teacher Forged GP Notes to Hide Fraud; Woman Suspended over Deceit

The Journal (Newcastle, England), December 17, 2008 | Go to article overview

Teacher Forged GP Notes to Hide Fraud; Woman Suspended over Deceit


Byline: Chris Robinson

ATEACHER who forged sick notes from her doctor to cover up court appearances has been suspended.

Janet Adams lied to her school and claimed she was at hospital when she was actually in the dock at Sunderland Magistrates' Court. Adams was found guilty of unacceptable professional conduct at a hearing this week and banned from the classroom for four months.

The former teacher at Ferryhill Business and Enterprise College, County Durham, had already been given a three-month suspension by education chiefs for helping a friend to make false benefit claims two years ago.

In its hearing this week, the General Teaching Council panel heard that Ms Adams had completed a sickness absence form telling her employers she had a hospital appointment.

But the lie was told to cover the fact she was in the dock over the benefit fraud, of which she was convicted.

The teacher later forged two letters purporting to be from her GP to support her absence. The committee said Ms Adams's conduct fell short of the standard expected of a registered teacher. …

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