Librarians Have Fun Mastering Technology

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), July 13, 2008 | Go to article overview

Librarians Have Fun Mastering Technology


Byline: Sarah Long

Imagine yourself in charge of an institution thats changing fast.

Your staff needs to learn new skills. They also need to be able to teach and use the new skills creatively for the institution.

This is a situation many library managers now face. Libraries used to be about books and other items printed on paper. The books and paper are still there, but now there are CDs, DVDs, Web sites, online databases, downloadable audio books, electronic games and more. Add to the mix the Internet and the fact that libraries are now in the content-generation business. In days of yore, libraries managed material written by others. Now, libraries are reaching out to their communities with content written by library staffers and community members. Libraries aspire to be hubs of community conversations and dialogues in person and online.

But I digress. Back to the library where you are in charge and staffers need help in bringing their skills up to date. Some staff members love computers and are comfortable with Internet 2.0 features including blogging, tagging and managing photos. Others are not interested, and frankly, not very good at learning about these new ways to work.

In 2006, Helene Blowers, then public services technology director for the Public Library of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County in Charlotte, N.C., found herself in just this position. Building on her belief that the "Big L" in library work was not about "library" but about "learning," Blowers created a program that makes learning fun. Called "Learning 2.0: 23 Things," its an online discovery program designed to encourage library staff to explore new technologies. Since 2006, the program has been copied and used as a model for similar programs in hundreds of libraries worldwide. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Librarians Have Fun Mastering Technology
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.