Russia's Oligarchy

By vanden Heuvel, Katrina | The Nation, February 17, 1997 | Go to article overview

Russia's Oligarchy


vanden Heuvel, Katrina, The Nation


The cover-up is ending in Moscow and Washington. Even President Boris Yeltsins Russian loyalists now admit publicly what has been increasingly evident for months: He is unlikely ever to return to office as a healthy leader, no matter how long he nominally holds the position. Meanwhile, Yeltsin's erstwhile partners in the Clinton Administration now insist, as Secretary of State Madeleine Albright put it in an interview on Meet the Press, Our relationships with Russia are based on where they're going, other people in the government."

The Russian political and financial class, which has profited richly from Yeltsins regime, is terrified of a succession struggle that would threaten its control of the country's wealth. In a recent interview, Deputy Security Council Secretary Boris Berezovsky announced proudly that he and six other businessmen control 50 percent of the Russian economy. "Russia is undergoing a redistribution of property on a scale unprecedented in history," he boasted. (Berezovsky is reportedly working with ex-Reagan P.R. honcho Michael Deaver to polish his image in the West, following a Forbes article accusing him of being "the godfather of Russias godfathers.")This newly risen oligarchy, whose financial tentacles extend through the political establishment, particularly fears Aleksandr Lebed, the 45-year-old retired general whose anti-corruption crusades and peacemaking role in ending the Chechen War have made him the most popular political figure in Russia today. Indeed, according to recent polls, if fair elections were to be held within ninety days of Yeltsins resignation or death, as required by the Constitution, Lebed would win.

In response to a question I put to him in New York in January, Lebed told me he didn't believe fair elections would be held. "Ordinary Russians are now as far from the real levers of power as dley were during Soviet Communist Party rule, and the oligarchy loathe and fear me. They are already scheming to avoid general elections. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Russia's Oligarchy
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.