Blood Sugar Holds Key to Preventing Alzheimers

Daily Mail (London), December 27, 2008 | Go to article overview

Blood Sugar Holds Key to Preventing Alzheimers


A SLOW, chronic reduction of blood sugar to the brain could trigger some forms of Alzheimers disease, U.S. researchers have said.

A study of human and mice brains suggests a reduction of blood flow deprives energy to the brain, setting off a process that produces the sticky clumps of protein researchers believe is a cause of the disease, they said.

The finding could lead to strategies such as exercise, reducing cholesterol and managing blood pressure to keep Alzheimers at bay, Robert Vassar and colleagues at Northwestern Universitys Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago reported.

This finding is significant because it suggests that improving blood flow to the brain might be an effective therapeutic approach to prevent or treat Alzheimers, Mr Vassar, who led the study, said in a statement.

If people start early enough, maybe they can dodge the bullet.

Alzheimers disease is incurable and is the most common form of dementia among older people. It affects the regions of the brain involving thought, memory and language. …

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Blood Sugar Holds Key to Preventing Alzheimers
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