Cast out of Washington, Republicans Rethink

By Romano, Andrew | Newsweek, January 5, 2009 | Go to article overview

Cast out of Washington, Republicans Rethink


Romano, Andrew, Newsweek


Byline: Andrew Romano

For most Republicans, losing 21 seats in the House, seven seats in the Senate and the leadership of the free world isn't cause for celebration. But most Republicans aren't governors. When the GOP state executives met in Miami in mid-November for the annual Republican Governors Association conference, newspaper reporters used words like "glum" and "weary" to describe the mood. Apparently, they weren't watching TV. Between meetings, a crush of eager politicians swarmed the CNN, MSNBC and Fox cameras to explain how the GOP should "right its ship"--in their humble opinions. "Governors are going to be a natural group that can help the Republican Party get back on its feet," Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal, 37, tells NEWSWEEK. "And not just me, but Republican governors all over this country."

In the coming years, plenty of well-paid professionals will provide the party with all the advice it can absorb. But now that the Democrats control Congress and the White House for the first time since 1994, only the GOP's 21 incoming and incumbent state executives will actually have the power to prove that Republican rule can work. "Our friends in [Washington] are in a minority, and there's not much they can do but obstruct, complain and occasionally defeat bad policy," Mississippi Gov. and former RNC chairman Haley Barbour noted in Miami. "But they can't propose Republican ideas, much less put them into effect." No wonder Barbour & Co.aare so cheery. In 1976, Georgia's Jimmy Carter reclaimed the White House after eight years of Nixon and Ford; it took a former California governor, Reagan, to revive the GOP. Later, pragmatic execs like Wisconsin's Tommy Thompson and Michigan's John Engler led the Republican resurgence of the early and mid-1990s, eventually propelling Gov. George W. Bush of Texas into the Oval Office. Byamaking strides on the state level,aa new generation of governors is now poised toarebuild the GOP for the Age of Obama--and in the process position themselves to lead the party in 2012.

While these rising Republican stars generally agree on a few fundamental principles--root out corruption, focus on substance, restrain spending--they split into conflicting camps in terms of how they actually govern. Their differences will define where the GOP goes next.aOn one side are the Traditionalists: "The people," as New York Times columnist David Brooks recently wrote, "who believe that conservatives"--like, say, John McCain--"have lost elections because they have strayed from the true creed." With a proven talent for rallying values voters, Sarah Palin is the group's undisputed darling, and party leaders will be watching how she governs (and grows) in Alaska.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cast out of Washington, Republicans Rethink
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.