Dutch Treat

By Conn, Earl L. | The Saturday Evening Post, March-April 1997 | Go to article overview

Dutch Treat


Conn, Earl L., The Saturday Evening Post


Winter-weary vacationers are treated royally on Aruba, a booming outpost of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.

A tanned and muscular bodybuilder sprinted toward the beach, eager to cool down after his morning workout at a nearby fitness center. Along with everyone else in the Palms Restaurant at the Hyatt Regency Aruba, Mike, the busboy, was impressed. "I'm going to look like that in two years," stated the teenager, flexing his already bulging biceps. He could say this with assurance because he recently had won an island bodybuilding competition.

Both Mike and his native Aruba share determination and confidence. Only Aruba is flexing its tourism muscles even faster--like right now. The island, a part of the Kingdom of the Netherlands 15 miles off the coast of Venezuela, is one of the Caribbean's hottest' destinations. Scores of cruise ships drop anchor weekly at the capital city port of Oranjestad. Almost 650,000 people arrived by air last year at the Queen Beatrix International Airport, many on charters from the United States. (Miami is 2 1/2 hours away; New York City, about 4 hours.) Visitors come from as far away as Russia; Canada is a steady market, and the United States is still the major supplier of tourists--60 percent of all who visit the island.

What is the attraction of this tiny royal outpost? Part of it has to do with the red carpet that Arubans love to roll out for guests. They enjoy being good hosts and approach hospitality as a team They're in it together--the Aruba Tourism Authority, the hotel association, taxi drivers, shopkeepers, restaurateurs, service personnel--and all are dedicated to providing a tourist friendly environment.

Melissa, the young waitress, went all out to please. Unsure of her English, she asked in Spanish if the diners had completed their meals. They signaled they had not, so she asked, "How do you say it in English?" Told that the word was "finished," she repeated it several times, smiled, and left the table, ready to ask her next customer at the right moment: "Are you finished? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dutch Treat
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.