The Rhythm & Blues of America: Famed Blues Guitarist Jimmie Vaughan Tells about His Involvement in the Movement to Restore Our Constitutional Republic

By Holt, Kelly Taylor | The New American, December 22, 2008 | Go to article overview

The Rhythm & Blues of America: Famed Blues Guitarist Jimmie Vaughan Tells about His Involvement in the Movement to Restore Our Constitutional Republic


Holt, Kelly Taylor, The New American


[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Guitar Player magazine called Jimmie Vaughan "a living legend." He's one of the most respected guitarists in the world of popular music. He started playing guitar when he was 13, and his mother said of his immediate adeptness, "It was like he played it all his life" His fans aren't just "fans"; they include other guitarists and musicians of significant renown, including Muddy Waters, Eric Clapton, B.B. King, Buddy Guy, and his brother, the late Stevie Ray Vaughan.

He is that good. But he's more than a musician. He is a classic-car builder and restorer. He is also a sounding board in the entertainment industry, beating a persistent S.O.S. about the fate of our country if we don't limit government and abide by the Constitution. He tries to convince other performers to join his tune so that everyone can hear. Of our country's slide into globalism, this Grammy Award-winning blues guitarist says to fellow musicians, "If we don't reclaim constitutional government fast, we may wake up to find that only government-approved musicians will have a gig to play!"

THE NEW AMERICAN: What is your background?

Jimmie Vaughan: I grew up in Dallas, and began playing in different bands in the mid-'60s. I ran off from home when I was 15 and decided I wanted to be a blues guitar player, which was the other side of the universe in terms of reality, but that's what I wanted to do and it was the best thing that could have happened. I was forced to be on my own. I went to San Francisco and Oakland playing guitar and looking for gigs. Then I came back to Dallas and got a job in a lumberyard, trying to get enough money to move to Austin. Austin back then was like San Francisco, wide open, lots of opportunities to play music. You could get gigs in clubs and play the kind of music you wanted. I moved to Austin in 1970 to play the blues full-time. I had big, crazy dreams of being a blues guitar player. I didn't know it at the time, but I learned that dreams come true. They don't always come when you want them, but with determination and hard work, they do come. That's why I have hopes about this constitutional government thing we're all chasing here.

TNA: How and when did you first become aware that something was wrong in America?

Vaughan: Well, I was in grade school in Dallas when Kennedy was assassinated. I was just down the road. That set the stage and had a big impact on my curiosity and my ability to trust "official" stories. And I remember thinking something was wrong around the time Clinton was going out and Bush was coming in. Before that, I didn't pay much attention to these things. I was ignorant and uninformed. I saw Michael Badnarik on television warning about the ten planks of the Communist Manifesto; he went through the Bill of Rights, and then said "if you want a copy of this, call me," so I did and that's what started it. Then I read Common Sense by Thomas Paine. It's a great book; everyone should read it. Then I got Ron Paul's "Republic If You Can Keep It," and I started going to Constitution classes. After a while I realized it wasn't really as complicated as I thought it was.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

TNA: What are you reading now? Vaughan: I just got The Mystery of Banking by Murray Rothbard. I stay informed and read the news on the Internet, and I watch The Simple Truth (a local cable-access TV show) and Alex Jones. When you figure out what they're up to and why, it changes the way the headlines look. You can see it coming--there it is! You know what's behind it. I'm reading the new Ron Paul book and I keep re-reading Common Sense.

TNA: Did you find that what you'd been taught in school was different from what you were now learning?

Vaughan: I had a teacher in junior high who read the Bill of Rights and the Constitution. I didn't go to high school, remember, I ran off. But in a way, it was good because I didn't have the usual brainwashing from the government training camp they call school. …

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