Economy Spirals, Government Spends

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), August 21, 2008 | Go to article overview

Economy Spirals, Government Spends


Economy spirals, government spends

Our economy lost another 51,000 jobs in July, making for seven straight months of job losses and a total loss of 463,000 for this year.

Unemployment went up to 5.7 percent from 5.5 percent. All this happened despite more job gains in government and education. (The Associated Press/Daily Herald, Aug. 2).

While the private sector has shed all these jobs, government jobs increased by 264,000 from June 07 to June 08. These public sector jobs were plus 165,000 in local jobs, plus 77,000 at the state level and 22,000 at the federal level. (Bureau of Labor Stats/U.S.A. Today, July 30).

The private sector continues to trim budgets, cut back on benefits, lay off people, curtail expansion plans while the public sector spends three times as fast as revenue.

State and local governments spent 7.8 percent more in the second quarter of 08 vs. 07. At the state level, revenue increased by only 2.5 percent.

The above facts are outrageous. With all the problems facing private industry and the small business employer, you would think the public sector paid by tax dollars, would also feel some of the pain.

All budgets and expenditures can be and should be trimmed. There should be no room for 4 percent to 10 percent automatic increases year after year. This applies to education, state, county and federal. Get real!

Robert Kennedy

Palatine

Why didnt Lottery money aid schools?

A few years back, many small business owners, gas stations and convenience stores were contacted with a program that would, we were told, solve the school funding problem, which had been long standing.

The anticipated solution was the inception of a gambling program called the Lottery.

People who are addicted to gambling could gamble at places where they frequent most often, and with only a few simple games, it was easy and the proceeds would benefit school programs.

Well, years have passed, the games have multiplied, moneys you cant even comprehend, yet now school problems still exist and are much worse.

At the time of the inception of the Lottery, I was a gas station lessee who signed up for this "great" program and at one time needed assistance.

Upon contacting the Lottery office, I was told that my representative was on vacation for three weeks. This program was relatively new and already individuals were benefiting other than the schools.

Its time that the news media and our fabulous local politicians direct their attention to previous promises and the administration of the Lottery program that was meant to solve our school programs.

However, it appears that it is simpler for our politicians to start recommending tax increases or even suggest that students, who need education, skip school for protesting.

Jim Wintercorn

Prospect Heights

Bible is a practical basis to create laws

In response to Judith A. Carlsons letter (Fence Post, Aug. 3) regarding a previous writers suggestion to use the Bible as a basis to create government law, I think she missed the point.

Simply put, if our politicians read their Bibles, they would learn much, and hopefully apply the good news as "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you" (Matthew 7:12).

Aside from the historical books of the Bible, there is so much we can learn from it regarding integrity, trust, honesty, purity, ethics, humility, peace, common sense, love, what-to-do and what-not-to-do and so forth.

We have a freedom to use whatever works for the good, so we should take the best advice from any Bible and apply it where needed which seems to be everywhere.

We have put power in mans hands, and as we can see, corruptness is rampant. We need divine intervention, and if you believe there is a God or not, we have the freedom (and so do our politicians) to be fundamentally "moral," which seems to be a dirty word with them. …

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