Our Trusted Friend - the Internet; in Association with NETPARK NET

The Journal (Newcastle, England), January 8, 2009 | Go to article overview
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Our Trusted Friend - the Internet; in Association with NETPARK NET


Byline: LEWIS HARRISON

ASURVEY released last week by global market research specialist, TNS, revealed some interesting facts about the way we're using the internet.

First off, it seems we're becoming less and less trusting of printed newspapers, whilst relying more on online sources. Less than a quarter of Britons surveyed regarded newspapers as 'highly trusted' sources of information. Conversely, 40% of the 2,500 UK respondents said they 'highly trusted' online news websites.

If the results are a little confusing (surely most people realise that much of the copy on news websites has been reproduced from the paper - and if you don't then check out this article online at www.nebusiness.co.uk), they'll nevertheless make pleasant reading for advocates of the internet.

And mercifully for any professional reporters reading this, it seems most web users don't blindly trust whatever they read online. Instead, they really do understand the differences between which online channels can be trusted and which cannot.

Wikipedia, for example, has been shown to be unreliable as a single source of info on several occasions, and fared much worse than news sites such as the BBC in the trust stakes, at just 24%. Private blogs were the least trusted source of information, with just six percent of Brits rating them 'highly trusted'.

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Our Trusted Friend - the Internet; in Association with NETPARK NET
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