Mayfair Squatters Restored My Faith

The Evening Standard (London, England), January 13, 2009 | Go to article overview

Mayfair Squatters Restored My Faith


Byline: RICHARD GODWIN

THERE is something immensely satisfying in strolling through Mayfair, pitching up at an exclusive residence and bowling right in. For the past week, it has been possible for you and I to do this, as the residents of 39A Clarges Mews have been holding an open house (Clarges, I can only assume, is the way the locals pronounce "Claridge's").

All you must do to enter this magnificent Grade II*-listed property, valued at [pounds sterling]22.5 million, is ask the two men on the door. If you are willing to do a bit of DIY they'll probably let you stay for good or at least until they are booted out, which they reckon will happen in two weeks, as they are, of course, merely squatters.

"Squatting sounds so romantic doesn't it?" opines Casper on the Evening Standard website. "Yet these people are thieves, pure and simple. They should be removed immediately and jailed." Yet most commentators applaud their actions. The house has been unoccupied for over 25 years, and, though it was bought by an investment company called Timekeeper in 2006, has remained empty Timekeeper is apparently waiting for planning permission.

The dozen or so squatters, mostly former art students aged 19 to 23, moved in after being threatened with eviction from a nearby [pounds sterling]6 million property, and are now providing free classes for the community in welding, bookbinding and juggling making art and living on unwanted food taken from skips. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mayfair Squatters Restored My Faith
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.