Deposed Pittsburgh Bishop Elected: Another Diocese Leaves Episcopal Church

Anglican Journal, December 2008 | Go to article overview

Deposed Pittsburgh Bishop Elected: Another Diocese Leaves Episcopal Church


EPISCOPAL NEWS SERVICE

Deposed Pittsburgh Bishop Robert Duncan was elected Nov. 7 to serve as bishop of a diocese where a majority of members recently voted to leave the Episcopal Church and realign with the South America-based Anglican Province of the Southern Cone.

In a related development, a majority of the delegates to the 131st synod of the diocese of Quincy voted that same day to leave the Episcopal Church and realign the diocese under the jurisdiction of the Southern Cone province. The action was carried out by passing two resolutions. The first formally annulled accession to "the constitution and canons of the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America."

The election of Bishop Duncan, which was held at a special convention of the realigned diocese of Pittsburgh, came seven weeks after Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori deposed him for "abandonment of communion" on the advice of the house of bishops after he led efforts to remove the Pittsburgh diocese from the Episcopal Church.

"It is good to be back," Duncan said following the election. "The most important thing now is to move beyond our conflict with the leadership of the Episcopal Church and turn all of our energies toward living as Christians and effectively sharing the good news of God's love and mercy for all people in the places God has put us."

A majority of deputies to the 143rd diocesan convention of the Episcopal diocese of Pittsburgh voted Oct. 4 to leave the Episcopal Church following disagreements over issues relating to biblical interpretation and human sexuality, including the election and consecration of an openly gay partnered man as bishop of New Hampshire.

Following the Oct. 4 realignment vote, Bishop Jefferts Schori said there is room in the Episcopal Church "for all who desire to be members of it. The actions of the former bishop of Pittsburgh, and some lay and clergy leaders, have removed themselves from this church; the rest of the church laments their departure. We stand ready to welcome the return of any who wish to rejoin this part of the body of Christ."

A press release from the realigned diocese said that the decision was made to leave "after years of disagreement with the leadership of The Episcopal Church over basic Christian beliefs about the authority of the Bible, the unique role of Jesus Christ in salvation, and Christian moral standards. …

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