LETTERS to 'E&P' on Media Coverage of Israel and Gaza

Editor & Publisher, January 4, 2009 | Go to article overview

LETTERS to 'E&P' on Media Coverage of Israel and Gaza


Here is a sampling of some of the many letters, pro and con, received here in response to commentary by Editor Greg Mitchell on media coverage of the buildup to Israel's invasion of Gaza, and events since (still posted near the top of our site). To comment, contact the email below or visit our blog at: The E&P Pub

***You've brought to light an issue that has concerned me and many others who are reading and watching the news coverage of the Gaza invasion.

The same veil of silence that silenced the US media leading up to the war in Iraq has now fallen over the Gaza situation. My question is what's happened to the US media? In the UK, the media seems to be much more vigorous--aggressively questioning the rationale of their government's positions on all issues, including the most pressing ones of the day.

I hope other journalists follow in your footsteps.

Brian OwensAmerican citizen based in Stockholm, Sweden*Thank you for your gutsy analysis of the Orwellian news coverage of the Gaza situation.

MacLeod Cushing

*Your byline says New York but you must be living in a media-free cave.

NPR, CNN, MSNBC, and countless web news sites have provided plenty of coverage of the Israeli action in Gaza. Most of it has been visibly biased in support of the Palestinians. Your stating that coverage has been one-sided in favor of Israel is a gross misstatement of the facts and may be your opinion, but is hardly reporting or objective journalism.

The New York Times is one newspaper, not "the media", and what "helpful balance" you ascribe to CNN is just plain bullshit. CNN, along with NPR, which has also heavily covered the conflict since the air strikes began, are the most obviously pro-Palestinian media outlets in America.

George Lakehomer*I am a Canadian from a Palestinian origin. I never replied to any author or send feedback but after reading your words I felt obligated to send you this email just to say Thank You for being fair. Only God knows how much civilian Gazans are going through while the whole world is watching and switching channels while sitting on their comfortable couches enjoying their hot drinks... I sometimes wonder if there is any conscience left.. let alone a true journalism that is unbiased. Again, Sir, I wanna thank you.

A.Hajjaj*Just a curious question: In your Jan. 4 column about U.S. media "silence" on the latest Gaza violence, I wonder why you failed to question where the coverage was of Hamas' stepped-up shelling of Israeli towns and villages prior to the IDF response. Absent such a question, which I think is a fair one because the military response isn't occuring out of the blue but in response to violent provocation, the column smacks of Palestinian sympathizing. It could have been written by Hamas' propaganda office.

And I question your label of the 2006 Lebanon invasion as a "fiasco" - which seems to be the lazy analysis because Western journalists don't have much skill or knowledge of military affairs. I thought the goal of that war was to end Hizbollah shelling of northern Israel ... which is exactly what happened.

You also make of point of quoting people discussing U.S.-made weapons being used by the IDF in Gaza and Lebanon, but don't mention that Hamas and Hizbollah is largely armed, financed and controlled by Iran. Why did you fail to mention that? Anyone with even a rudimentary understanding of the conflict knows both terror groups don't sneeze without permission for Tehran. Their guns, grenades, bombs, rockets and other weapons are supplied from the outside, yet you don't believe that is worthy of questioning by the media? …

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LETTERS to 'E&P' on Media Coverage of Israel and Gaza
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