The FP Quiz: Are You a Globalization Junkie? Test Your Knowledge of Global Trends, Economics, and Politics with 8 Questions about How the World Works

Foreign Policy, January-February 2009 | Go to article overview

The FP Quiz: Are You a Globalization Junkie? Test Your Knowledge of Global Trends, Economics, and Politics with 8 Questions about How the World Works


1 After the United States and India, which country has the world's largest film industry?

(A) Britain

(B) Brazil

C Nigeria

[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED]

2 Other than the United States, how many countries use the U.S. dollar as their official currency?

(A) 2

(B) 7

(C) 12

3 What percentage of the world's seafood comes from farms?

(A) 21 percent

(B) 33 percent

(C) 42 percent

[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED]

4 How much of an increase in cocaine has Africa seen since 2000?

(A) 5x

(B) 15x

(C) 30x

5 How many countries do not have standing armies?

(A) 9

(B) 24

(C) 45

[ILLUSTRATIONS OMITTED]

6 How many trees per person are there in the world?

(A) 0.6

(B) 6

(C) 61

7 How many of the corporations on Fortune's 500 List are run by women?

(A) 4

(B) 12

(C) 36

8 What is the world's most popular newspaper?

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

(A) Bild (Germany)

(B) Yomiuri Shimbun (Japan)

(C) People's Daily (China)

Answers to the FP Quiz

1) C, Nigeria. Hollywood may produce all the blockbusters, and India's Bollywood has the market cornered when it comes to song and dance, but Nigeria's Nollywood rakes in cash by churning out low-budget, direct-to-video flicks. Movies are filmed in less than two weeks for about $10,000 to $25,000, edited in a day or two, and sold dirt cheap by street hawkers. With 2,400 films produced every year, the movies pull in heady $290 million in revenue across Africa.

2) B, 7. The greenback may be weak, but it is still the official currency in East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, and Panama. Guatemala permits use of the dollar and other currencies, but businesses aren't required to accept them. Meanwhile, the U.S. dollar is the de facto currency in many other countries, such as Cambodia, Cuba, and Liberia.

3) C, 42 percent. As wild fish stocks are overexploited worldwide, the percentage of farmed seafood is predicted to rise to more than half of the world's total in the next decade, according to the Worldwatch Institute. Presently, the most farmed seafoods are those that are low on the food chain, such as carp, tilapia, and shellfish. …

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