Climate Change: Act Now, We're Told, If We Want to Save the Planet from a Climate Catastrophe. Trouble Is, It Might Be Too Late. the Science Is Settled, and the Damage Has Already Begun. the Only Question Now Is Whether We Will Stop Playing Political Games and Embrace the Few Imperfect Options We Have Left

By McKibben, Bill | Foreign Policy, January-February 2009 | Go to article overview
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Climate Change: Act Now, We're Told, If We Want to Save the Planet from a Climate Catastrophe. Trouble Is, It Might Be Too Late. the Science Is Settled, and the Damage Has Already Begun. the Only Question Now Is Whether We Will Stop Playing Political Games and Embrace the Few Imperfect Options We Have Left


McKibben, Bill, Foreign Policy


"Scientists Are Divided"

No, they're not. In the early years of the global warming debate, there was great controversy over whether the planet was warming, whether humans were the cause, and whether it would be a significant problem. That debate is long since over. Although the details of future forecasts remain unclear, there's no serious question about the general shape of what's to come.

Every national academy of science, long lists of Nobel laureates, and in recent years even the science advisors of President George W. Bush have agreed that we are heating the planet. Indeed, there is a more thorough scientific process here than on almost any other issue: Two decades ago, the United Nations formed the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and charged its scientists with synthesizing the peer-reviewed science and developing broad-based conclusions. The reports have found since 1995 that warming is dangerous and caused by humans. The panel's most recent report, in November 2007, found it is "very likely" (defined as more than 90 percent certain, or about as certain as science gets) that heat-trapping emissions from human activities have caused "most of the observed increase in global average temperatures since the mid-20th century."

If anything, many scientists now think that the IPCC has been too conservative--both because member countries must sign off on the conclusions and because there's a time lag. Its last report synthesized data from the early part of the decade, not the latest scary results, such as what we're now seeing in the Arctic.

In the summer of 2007, ice in the Arctic Ocean melted. It melts a little every summer, of course, but this time was different--by late September, there was 25 percent less ice than ever measured before. And it wasn't a one-time accident. By the end of the summer season in 2008, so much ice had melted that both the Northwest and Northeast passages were open. In other words, you could circumnavigate the Arctic on open water. The computer models, which are just a few years old, said this shouldn't have happened until sometime late in the 21st century. Even skeptics can't dispute such alarming events.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

"We Have Time"

Wrong. Time might be the toughest part of the equation. That melting Arctic ice is unsettling not only because it proves the planet is warming rapidly, but also because it will help speed up the warming. That old white ice reflected 80 percent of incoming solar radiation back to space; the new blue water left behind absorbs 80 percent of that sunshine. The process amps up. And there are many other such feedback loops. Another occurs as northern permafrost thaws. Huge amounts of methane long trapped below the ice begin to escape into the atmosphere; methane is an even more potent green-house gas than carbon dioxide.

Such examples are the biggest reason why many experts are now fast-forwarding their estimates of how quickly we must shift away from fossil fuel. Indian economist Rajendra Pachauri, who accepted the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize alongside AI Gore on behalf of the IpCC, said recently that we must begin to make fundamental reforms by 2012 or watch the climate system spin out of control; NASA scientist James Hansen, who was the first to blow the whistle on climate change in the late 1980s, has said that we must stop burning coal by 2030. Period.

All of which makes the Copenhagen climate change talks that are set to take place in December 2009 more urgent than they appeared a few years ago. At issue is a seemingly small number: the level of carbon dioxide in the air. Hansen argues that 350 parts per million is the highest level we can maintain "if humanity wishes to preserve a planet similar to that on which civilization developed and to which life on Earth is adapted." But because we're already past that mark--the air outside is currently about 387 parts per million and growing by about 2 parts annually--global warming suddenly feels less like a huge problem, and more like an Oh-My-God Emergency.

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Climate Change: Act Now, We're Told, If We Want to Save the Planet from a Climate Catastrophe. Trouble Is, It Might Be Too Late. the Science Is Settled, and the Damage Has Already Begun. the Only Question Now Is Whether We Will Stop Playing Political Games and Embrace the Few Imperfect Options We Have Left
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