The Dyslexia 'Myth'

Daily Mail (London), January 15, 2009 | Go to article overview

The Dyslexia 'Myth'


Byline: Laura Clark

DYSLEXIA is a myth invented by education experts to cover up poor teaching of reading, a Labour MP has said.

Backbencher Graham Stringer called the condition a 'cruel fiction', which should be consigned to the 'dustbin of history'.

Dyslexia is said to be an impaired ability to process the units of spoken and written language. Six million of us are believed to have it.

But Mr Stringer said it was 'wicked' to label children with the condition because bad teaching had failed them.

An 'industry' has been created around dyslexia, giving children financial and educational incentives to demonstrate reading problems such as extra time in exams, the MP for Manchester Blackley said. However, his remarks were condemned by those who work to tackle dyslexia.

Mr Stringer said: 'The sooner it is consigned to the same dustbin of history, the better. Why does the education system, even after the huge injection of funds over the past ten years, fail so many people and what can be done about it?' The reason is that the 'wrong teaching methods are used', he said.

'The education establishment, rather than admit that their eclectic and incomplete methods for instruction are at fault, have invented a brain disorder called dyslexia,' he claimed.

'To label children as dyslexic because they're confused by poor teaching methods is wicked.

'If dyslexia really existed, then countries as diverse as Nicaragua and South Korea would not have been able to achieve literacy rates of nearly 100 per cent,' he wrote in a column for the entertainment website Manchester Confidential.

'Certified dyslexics get longer in exams. There has been created a situation where there are financial and educational incentives to being bad at spelling and reading.' Mr Stringer said dyslexia had been eradicated in West Dunbartonshire where the council used synthetic phonics, where children are taught the 43 sounds of the alphabet and how to blend them. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Dyslexia 'Myth'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.