Political Science

Michigan Academician, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

Political Science


The Democratic Peace in the Indo-Pakistani Dyad. Sathyan Sundaram, Lake Michigan College, Department of Political Science, Benton Harbor, MI 49022

Scholars have offered a number of explanations for the outbreak of war with regard to regime-type. Six hypotheses derived from works studying "the democratic peace" have been operationalized and quantitatively tested on the Indo-Pakistani dyad. This paper seeks to look at the nature of the processes that are argued to underlie of the democratic peace. Rather than finding support for all the hypotheses posited, only-freedom and nonmilitary IGO's are found to exhibit a statistically significant relationship. While freedom had a significant relationship with conflict, outcomes were not as die hypothesis expected. Only IGO's were both significant and found outcomes matching expectations. Besides what can he said about conflictual dyads, this project attempts to problematize the enterprise of falsifying the democratic peace. No longer should the question be: Is there empirical support for the democratic peace? This is a test of the sub-theories, or interpretations, of the democratic peace research program on the lndo-Pakistani dyad. Some are supported; some are not. So, the question becomes: What aspects or interpretations of the democratic peace research program receive support?

Voting Patterns on Hungarian Elections in 2002-2004: Some Historical Perspectives. Barnabas Racz, Eastern Michigan University, Department of Political Science, Ypsilanti, MI 48197

In constitutional democracies horizontal divergences arc more the rule than the exception in voting preferences; the phenomenon is a natural one and it is an expression of democratic pluralism. In historical perspective, the Hungarian political map is divided by a south-west/north-east axis that roughly divides the electorate into a left-center/right-center camp. The roots of this division in the country go back to historical reasons and are observable since 19SS to the present 2006 elections. …

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