Slavic & Eastern European Studies

Michigan Academician, Winter 2008 | Go to article overview

Slavic & Eastern European Studies


Some Nuances in Pascal that Thomas G. Masaryk Overlooked. Steve J. Van Der Weele, Calvin College

When recalling the achievements of the venerable Thomas G. Masaryk (1850 -1937)--teacher, historian, leader of the Czech Republic and its first president, humanist, ethicist, social scientist--we need also to acknowledge his role as a philosopher. He brilliantly exegeted the modern philosophers--David Hume, Immanuel Kant, Hegel, and others. He did so with a view to accounting for the pathologies of the modern world, dramatically evident from the high number of suicides occurring in the Western world. And he was intrigued by the Christian apologist Blaise Pascal, whom he found wanting in several ways. Acknowledging Pascal's achievements in science and math, he nevertheless calls the philosopher Pascal a skeptic, a pessimist, a man with a jaundiced view of reality. As a lapsed Catholic, Masaryk, in my opinion, wishes to avert his gaze from the traditional church doctrines so crucial to Pascal's thought, choosing selections from the lower branches of the Pascalian tree and ignoring some of the higher reaches. The passages on which Masaryk relies for his judgments must be seen in the context of Pascal's intent in his work, the Pensees.

Enlightenment Elements in the Thought of Hryhorij Skovoroda (1722-94). Stephen P. Scherer, Central Michigan University

The work of the Ukrainian thinker, Hryhorij Skovoroda (1722-94), has elicited a large secondary literature in the two centuries since his death. With the exception of Soviet writers, who painted him as a materialist and democrat, the students of Skovoroda's work have seen him as a theologian, mystic and moralist. The Russian critic, Vissarion Belinsky (1811-48), censured Skovoroda because he was exclusively concerned with spiritual matters. Not much later, the Russian church historian, Archbishop Filaret (1805-66), argued that Skovoroda's thought was tainted by its familiarity with Jacob Boehme's "muddle headed mysticism". …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Slavic & Eastern European Studies
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.