Schools Sack Sick Teachers; Dismissals Triple in Just One Year

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), January 23, 2009 | Go to article overview

Schools Sack Sick Teachers; Dismissals Triple in Just One Year


Byline: by BEN TURNER Education Reporter

THE number of Liverpool teachers sacked by their schools has tripled within a year - almost all due to ill health.

An ECHO investigation found a growing number of teachers across the city's schools are being formally dismissed because they are too sick to continue teaching.

Figures obtained under the Freedom of Information Act showed six teachers were permanently shown the door last year, only one for a disciplinary matter.

The remainder left on health grounds, ranging from long-term sickness to persistent back problems.

That compares to two dismissals in 2006-7 - one for ill health and the other for a breach of discipline.

Head teachers today insisted the ill-health dismissals were done with the blessing of staff and in keeping with government rules.

The government asks schools and occupational health experts to exhaust all avenues to try and help teachers stay in work, such as working less hours or doing lighter duties.

But, when a teacher is permanently incapable to teach, school bosses have to apply on their behalf to access ill-health pensions.

If the application is approved by government medical advisers, schools are told to formally sack staff. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Schools Sack Sick Teachers; Dismissals Triple in Just One Year
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.