A Soldier for All Humanity

Manila Bulletin, January 25, 2009 | Go to article overview
Save to active project

A Soldier for All Humanity


TODAY, many people are talking of Israel's military might. Today, the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) can compare with the best in the world. Today, Israel, a small nation (located in the Middle East bordered by Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, and Egypt) with a population in 2008 of 7.28 million has shown to the world (after the State of Israel was established on May 14, 1948) that despite great odds, it will defend its sovereignty and independence against invaders. It will be recalled that within 24 hours from the proclamation on May 14, 1948 of the statehood of Israel according to the United Nations partition plan in 1947 between the Arab and Jewish communities -- the armies of Egypt, Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, and Iraq in full force attacked Israel. The fighting lasted for 15 months and over 6,000 Israel lives (about one percent of Israel's Jewish population at that time) were lost. But the war ended in victory for Israel.

***

One may ask: Who is the military expert who helped organize the army of Israel even before the State of Israel was born? Who planned the military strategy for Israel whose name is forever etched in the annals of Israel history? This article is about this man whose gravestone at West Point in US identifies him as "A Soldier for All Humanity;" whose colorful and adventurous military life had been immortalized in a Hollywood movie titled "Cast A Giant Shadow" with Kirk Douglas portraying this man. Finally, David Ben-Gurion who later became Prime Minister of Israel paid his tribute to this military expert as follows: "He was the best man we had."

***

For background information about Israel from the biblical standpoint, let me share the following:

* No other national group has experienced the long sufferings and the trials of the Jews from the time they were saved after 400 years of bondage in Egypt sometime in 1400 B.C. Moses was chosen by God to lead the Jews out of Egypt to the Land of Israel promised to their forefathers. Wandering for 40 years in the Sinai desert tested again the persistence of the Jews. Israel's history includes periods when Israel was crushed by other people like Assyrians, the Babylonians, and the Persians. Today, media is keeping a close watch on Israel's moves to protect itself from military attacks from the Palestinians and other hostile forces all around her;

* So often said that Israel is the only nation created by a sovereign act of God. A more astounding Biblical commitment of God to the Israelites is His promise to defend Israel from those nations that fight Israel because by fighting Israel those nations in effect are fighting against God. The basis of this divine protection for Israel is found in the Book of Genesis, the first book of the Holy Bible. It will be recalled that during the early Biblical times, God found favor with a righteous man called Abram (name later changed by God to Abraham). God made a covenant with Abram, the forefather of the Jewish people, as follows: "Leave your country, your people and your father's household and go to the land I will show you. I will make you into a great nation and I will bless you; I will make your name great, and you will be a blessing. I will bless those who bless you, and whoever curses you I will curse; and all people on earth will be blessed." (Genesis 12:13) With this Biblical verse, Israel has been guaranteed a divine insurance policy against destruction or extinction as a nation;

* Many people cannot erase from their memories the holocaust catastrophe where about six million Jews were murdered during the Nazi regime of Hitler under every conceivable torture scheme;

* Israel is always vigilant of military attacks from her Arab neighbors. The 1967 Six-Day War once again demonstrated the military dominance and prowess of Israel. Israel fought Egypt, Jordan and Syria to preserve its territorial boundaries. As a consequent of the Six-Day War in 1967, Israel was able to add to its boundaries certain areas earlier occupied by her Arab enemies.

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
Loading One moment ...
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited article

A Soldier for All Humanity
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

While we understand printed pages are helpful to our users, this limitation is necessary to help protect our publishers' copyrighted material and prevent its unlawful distribution. We are sorry for any inconvenience.
Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.

Are you sure you want to delete this highlight?