The Works of William Wells Brown: Using His "Strong, Manly Voice"

By Carson, Jack | The Western Journal of Black Studies, Spring 2007 | Go to article overview

The Works of William Wells Brown: Using His "Strong, Manly Voice"


Carson, Jack, The Western Journal of Black Studies


The Works of William Wells Brown: Using His "Strong, Manly Voice"

EDITORS: PAULA GARRETT AND HOLLIS ROBBINS

OXFORD UNIVERSITY PRESS, 2006

PRICE: $19.00

ISBN: 0-195-30963-4

In this collection of past publications called The Works of William Wells Brown: Using His "Strong, Manly Voice" Paula Garrett and Hollis Robbins have brought together a splendid selection from the totality of the writings having William Wells Brown as their author. This is the first time a single volume has been designed with the primary purpose to exhibit, and to focus attention upon, Brown's writings. When the collection named was published in 2006, Paula Garrett was a professor of English and American Studies at Millsaps College, Jackson, MS, while Hollis Robbins was a member of the Humanities Faculty at the Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD.

William Wells Brown was a nineteenth century black American intellectual, abolitionist orator, and man of letters. It is possible that he was also the first black American to earn a living from oration and publication. He was born in, or near, 1814 in Lexington, KY, and he died 6 November 1884 in Chelsea, near Boston, MA. Legally, in relation to United States law, he was born into bondage, or, that is, he was born a slave person: his father was white, but his mother was a black slave, so he took the status of his mother. In 1834, he escaped bondage. For the twenty-year period of time from 1834 to 1854, he was a fugitive slave so-called; then, in 1854, he passed from being a slave person to being a free person when some of his British friends bought his freedom. In 1843, he began giving orations for the Western New York Anti-Slavery Society, and, in 1849, representing the American Peace Society, he departed from the United States to attend the International Peace Congress held in Paris, France. In 1850, the Fugitive Slave Act was put into law, and, because he did not want to be returned to bondage, he travelled to England and remained there until 1854. In the United States once again, he continued speaking against black American slavery until 1866. Otherwise, in 1847, Brown wrote the first of his more than one autobiographies The Narrative of William W. Wells, A Fugitive Slave, Written By Himself," in 1853, he wrote Clotel; or, the President's Daughter: A Narrative of Slave Life in the United States; and, in 1858, he wrote The Escape; or, A Leap for Freedom. (See, for example, Works, the introduction.) Brown's Narrative occupies a place within the tradition of black American slave narratives next to others published during the period of time, inclusively, 1840-1850: for example, it takes its place next to the autobiographies of Frederick Douglass (1845), Henry Bibb (1849), J. W. C. Pennington (1849), Nancy Prince (1850), and Sojourner Truth (1850). His Clotel is regarded by some as the first novel having a black American author. His Escape is regarded by some as the first drama having a black American author. In The Works of William Wells Brown, the several selections are arranged into seven separate parts. In part one, there are five works set out under the heading "Speeches," in part two, two works, under the heading "Autobiographical Writings;" in part three, two works, under the heading "Travel Writings;" in part four, two works, under the heading "Fiction;" in part five, three works, under the heading "Writing Race and Gender;" in part six, four works, under the heading "Selected Letters;" and, in part seven, four works, under the heading "Teaching William Wells Brown.:

In The Works of William Wells Brown, then, counting repetitions, there are twenty-two works written by William Wells Brown. One of the pieces appearing in part seven is a repetition of part of The Escape; another one there is a repetition of part of My Southern Home. Within each part, other than part five, the several selections are arranged strictly in order of time. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Works of William Wells Brown: Using His "Strong, Manly Voice"
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.