Over 40 000 Spectators Watch Pocket Power Take First Hat-Trick Win in Race's History

Cape Times (South Africa), February 2, 2009 | Go to article overview

Over 40 000 Spectators Watch Pocket Power Take First Hat-Trick Win in Race's History


BYLINE: MICHELLE JONES

DESCRIBED by most as the best yet, this year's J&B Met broke all the rules - with the fashion being exceptional and the races thrilling.

Kenilworth Race Course was packed on Saturday with racing enthusiasts and fashionistas braving the heat and blustery wind for the country's biggest outdoor party.

Spectators stuck to the theme of Glitz and Glam with plenty of black and silver to be seen.

Women wore short dresses, flat shoes and, instead of donning the usual larger than life headwear, opted for fascinators - small arrangements of feathers, beads and flowers.

The men wore suits and shirts of all colours, caps and hats of all styles and pointy-toed shoes.

There were the usual extreme few who dressed to impress - including Marilyn Monroe and Elvis Presley who wowed the crowd as they tottered along on stilts.

The Met draws thousands of visitors into the city, generating at least R52 million for the Western Cape economy and R18m alone for the fashion industry.

Spectators sat on the grass to watch the horses and outlandish outfits parade by.

The rich, famous and well-connected gathered in the J&B Marquee to socialise, eat and drink.

Bartenders whipped up J&B cocktails and milkshakes decorated with Smarties and sprinkles. …

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Over 40 000 Spectators Watch Pocket Power Take First Hat-Trick Win in Race's History
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