Dunking on Arne Duncan

By Zirin, Dave | The Progressive, February 2009 | Go to article overview

Dunking on Arne Duncan


Zirin, Dave, The Progressive


"I think we are putting together the best basketball-playing cabinet in American history." So said Barack Obama upon naming Arne Duncan his nominee for Secretary of Education.

There is no doubt that when it comes to hoops, Duncan has game. The man stands six feet five inches. He was an Academic All-American baller at Harvard University and played professionally in Australia for four years. Long before becoming chief executive officer of Chicago Public Schools, Duncan put in time in the U.S. minor league hoops circuit with teams like the Rhode Island Gulls and New Jersey Jammers.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Unfortunately, we aren't selecting a pickup squad. What is at stake is the future of public education. And when it comes to our schools Duncan's record brands him as a scrub. As someone who taught in the D.C. public schools for four years and whose wife still slogs through the crumbling infrastructure of our schools, this is personal for me. If you believe that "we can't just throw money" at schools, that unions are a block to reform, that the military should have open access to our kids, and that charter schools are the greatest thing to happen to education since corporal punishment, then Arne Duncan should warm the cockles of your heart.

Duncan has rejected many of Chicago's local school councils and has converted roughly twenty Chicago public schools a year over to private operations. He loves the stultifying test taking used to judge national standards, and stands firmly with the notion that teachers at poorly testing schools should be canned. He has also turned a blind eye to addressing a study from his alma mater, Harvard University, that Chicago's public school's are "only a few percentage points from an experience of total apartheid for black students.

At Chicago's Senn High School, students, parents, and teachers organized together in a high profile campaign to keep the city from installing a Naval Academy inside the school. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Dunking on Arne Duncan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.