'How Can We Be Expected to Have Confidence in a Company That Has Broken the Law on Numerous Occasions in America? We Are Suffering the Effects of the Mine. Now We Have Another Battle on Our Hands' Worried Residents Hit out as Full Scope of Incinerator Firm's History Is Revealed

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 9, 2009 | Go to article overview

'How Can We Be Expected to Have Confidence in a Company That Has Broken the Law on Numerous Occasions in America? We Are Suffering the Effects of the Mine. Now We Have Another Battle on Our Hands' Worried Residents Hit out as Full Scope of Incinerator Firm's History Is Revealed


Byline: Martin Shipton Chief Reporter

A COMPANY behind a huge "energy from waste" incinerator planned for Wales has been fined hundreds of thousands of dollars in the United States for emitting cancer-causing chemicals from similar plants, the Western Mail can reveal today.

Covanta has unveiled plans for an incinerator at Merthyr Tydfil that would generate about 70 megawatts of electricity - enough to supply power to up to 180,000 homes. The plant would burn around 750,000 tonnes of waste a year.

News of the company's lawbreaking record in America horrified residents in Merthyr, where it would be sited next to the controversial Ffos-y-Fran opencast coal mine.

Elizabeth Condron, who mounted an unsuccessful legal challenge against the mine, said: "How can we be expected to have confidence in a company that has broken the law on numerous occasions in America? We are already suffering the effects of the mine. Now we have another battle on our hands to stop this going ahead."

Because it is classified as a power plant generating more than 50 megawatts of electricity, the decision on whether the Merthyr development goes ahead will be taken not in Wales, but by a UK Government quango to be called the Infrastructure Planning Commission. The commission is being set up to speed the planning process for big projects. Sceptics say the new system will make it easier for controversial projects to be passed.

Scott Whitney, president of Covanta-Europe, said: "Covanta Energy is the world leader in the operation of energy from waste facilities. We operate on a policy of honesty and transparency and believe in active dialogue with existing and potential neighbours.

"Covanta fully supports the concept of the three Rs - reduce, reuse and recycle - and will commit itself to these principles in Wales. However, for waste that cannot be reasonably or economically recycled it believes in the fourth R of energy, recovery, as a better option than putting waste into landfill sites. Our plants use waste left over after recycling as a fuel to generate heat and electricity.

"We have no problem with people and campaigners voicing their opposition - debate is the foundation of consensus. We have already announced there will be a lengthy and comprehensive period of public consultation before a planning application is submitted. During the planning process we will answer questions from the public and from statutory bodies. The planning application will include a full environmental impact assessment. We will have to demonstrate the plant will be safe before planning permission can be granted.

"The company's global track record in safety is excellent and this can be verified byawide range of awards and acknowledgements the company has received in recent years from environmental and governmental bodies.

"We agree with the UK Government and environmentalists that it is time to stop dumping waste in holes in the ground. Our proven technology is environmentally superior to landfilling - there are over 340 energy from waste plants operating successfully in Europe processing 48m tonnes of waste annually, providing an option that is cost effective for council tax payers and better for the environment. Our approach is to treat our plants as power stations capable of generating a clean, renewable amount of electricity and thereby reducing the dependency on carbon fuels such as gas, coal and oil. This, in turn, helps the environment.

"The plant proposed at Merthyr will take much of the waste across Wales after recycling; it will greatly reduce truck movements as most waste will be moved by trains in sealed containers; produce enough electricity to meet the needs of 180,000 homes and provide employment for 500 people during construction and a further 100 jobs once it is operational.

"It will be monitored by the Environment Agency, which needs to grant an operating licence before it can be commissioned. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

'How Can We Be Expected to Have Confidence in a Company That Has Broken the Law on Numerous Occasions in America? We Are Suffering the Effects of the Mine. Now We Have Another Battle on Our Hands' Worried Residents Hit out as Full Scope of Incinerator Firm's History Is Revealed
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.