The Newly Appointed President of Harvest Productions Gives His Take on the Art World Green-Up

By Wiley, Jennifer Dulin | Art Business News, January 2009 | Go to article overview

The Newly Appointed President of Harvest Productions Gives His Take on the Art World Green-Up


Wiley, Jennifer Dulin, Art Business News


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Harvest launched with a green concept in mind back in 1988 Tell us about Harvest's first eco. friendly initiatives and how they've evolved over the years.

As an exclusively on-demand printing company, Harvest Productions has always been based on a green idea. Our proprietary on-demand-based software reduces the need for galleries or publishers to carry stock, which is the greatest way a printer can help the environment. The implementation of our web-based electronic workflow reduces time, administration and material costs for the customer as well as for the manufacturer.

One of the most critical departments at Harvest Productions is the prototyping department, which allows our customers to find and prove a market first before making a further investment. A more recent innovation allows us to print on metal, plastic, stone and wood, which eliminates the need for lamination, glazing or framing. Any of these gained efficiencies have a multiplying effect that allow art professionals to do more with less. I believe these gains in efficiencies are at the heart of the global green movement, but there's still a long way to go.

Why is the green mentality so important to Harvest?

My father, John Doe, the creator of Harvest, graduated from high school in 1968 and is a part of a general American movement that doesn't endorse mindless consumerism. Being raised with these ideals, and working alongside my father for so many years, has led me to adopt his values as my own.

What are today's artists looking for in green technology?

Artists who are thinking green are interested in substrates that are renewable and biodegradable. We're currently prototyping biodegradable products for marine-life artist Wyland that keep in line with his environmental message, just like his early adoption of giclee technology.

Tell us about your latest green innovation, Harvest Compo.

Compo is a product that comes from a biodegradable waste process. We're taking the surplus chaff left from the barley grain during the beer-making process (that would have otherwise ended up in a landfill) and pressing it into a wooden board, which Harvest then prints artwork on. So, we're working from waste material, we're saving it from the leaching that occurs when in the landfill, and ultimately, when the art reaches the end of its life cycle, it'll go back to nature.

What else is Harvest doing to promote the green movement?

Harvest has added management services to its product line. These services advise artists and assist in the placement of art. Being an on-demand company, we always encourage a green product line. …

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The Newly Appointed President of Harvest Productions Gives His Take on the Art World Green-Up
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