Rodriguez Offers Only Dumb Logic

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), February 20, 2009 | Go to article overview

Rodriguez Offers Only Dumb Logic


Byline: Tom Knott, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Alex Rodriguez said he should have gone to college because then he would not have become young and dumb at age 25, when he started using performance-enhancing drugs with the Texas Rangers.

Everything would have turned out differently for Rodriguez if he merely had taken the time to crack open a book at 18 and soak up the enlightenment that comes with being a college student.

Rodriguez knows what every American knows: A college campus is a temple of purity. No one is tempted to use performance-enhancing drugs in college because of Aristotle's truths that permeate the locker room.

If only Rodriguez had been exposed to the teachings of an instructor as analytical as Ward Churchill, he would have been better able to endure the strength-sapping heat of Texas and not felt the need to seek a synthetic boost.

If only he could have back that period in his life, he would not have been sitting before a media horde in Tampa, Fla., this week, dispensing unsettling facts and figures, choking up at one point. He could not be certain the drugs aided his performance. He could not even be certain he was being injected in the most beneficial fashion.

You see, he was a one-man BALCO operation - two if you count his cousin, the errand boy. He took injections twice a month during a three-year period from 2001 to 2003, and he was just young and dumb, even as he passed his 28th birthday.

In Rodriguez's world, 28 is the new 15. At least that was one of the principal elements of his story, crafted in part by his crisis-management team. His team could mold the story. His team could not sell it. That was on Rodriguez.

And he tried to sell it between sips on his water bottle. Yet his story always came back to being young and dumb, even as he put more meat on the story and gave up a cousin.

Last week, with ESPN's Peter Gammons, Rodriguez could not recall the substance he used. …

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