Diet, Disability, and Dorothy (the Food Fascist)

By Levinson, Jerry | The Exceptional Parent, February 2009 | Go to article overview

Diet, Disability, and Dorothy (the Food Fascist)


Levinson, Jerry, The Exceptional Parent


This column has a simple purpose but a difficult goal--discuss issues that affect the lives, well-being, and state of mind of those who must live and cope with a disability and do so in a humorous way. Not an easy thing to do, since there is certainly nothing funny or humorous about having a disability or in the obstacles that those with chronic disabilities encounter daily (I've had multiple sclerosis [MS] for 39 years and use a wheelchair). However, I've personally found that humor has, to a great extent, helped me cope with my disability, and I hope this column helps others with disabilities to do so as well.

In this column, I've often spoken about Dorothy--my Queen and noble wife of 42 years--and, without exception, have written about her in the most affectionate of ways.. Not so this time. There is, unfortunately, a dark side to Dot, and it manifests itself in her persistent and inexorable attempts to restrict my intake of food.

For some crazy reason, Dorothy thinks I'm fat and, because of what I consider the smallest amount of flab conceivable around my middle, do not portray a svelte and flattering figure. I, on the other hand, think my build is comparable to that possessed by the Governor of my fair state--Arnold Schwarzenegger. Dot, however, says my physique is more comparable to that of the late Junior Samples, the rotund actor who played a hillbilly on the long-running TV show, Hee Haw.

Dorothy's misconceptions regarding my weight and appearance have prompted her to deny me the opportunity to consume cakes, cookies, eggplant parmesan, brownie pudding, egg rolls, and, worst of all, pizza--the very staples of what I consider a well-balanced diet. She places smaller snack items, such as cakes, cookies, pretzels, and potato chips, in locations that I cannot possibly reach because I use a wheelchair, such as the top of the refrigerator or the highest altitude pantry shelves. The psychological damage this has caused me is apparent.

I Hate It When She's Always Right

I grudgingly acknowledge that the Draconian steps that Dorothy has taken to keep me away from those consumables I love so dearly have been undertaken in my best interests. The symptoms of multiple sclerosis are exacerbated by poor nutrition, which is implicated in far more than weight gain.

In addition to weight gain, poor nutrition may also pose a risk for bowel and bladder dysfunction, depression, sleep disturbance, urinary tract infections, diabetes, circulatory problems, and osteoporosis, among other conditions.

USDA Nutrition Guidelines

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) believes that complying with the following dietary guidelines can significantly diminish the risks posed by poor nutrition:

* Eat a wide variety of foods. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Diet, Disability, and Dorothy (the Food Fascist)
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.