Hospitals out to Keep Nurses

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), February 22, 2009 | Go to article overview

Hospitals out to Keep Nurses


Byline: Rasha Madkour Associated Press

MIAMI u Newly minted nurse Katie OAEBryan was determined to stay at her first job at least a year, even if she did leave the hospital every day wanting to quit.

She lasted nine months. The stress of trying to keep her patients from getting much worse as they waited, sometimes for 12 hours, in an overwhelmed Dallas emergency room was just too much. The breaking point came after paramedics brought in a child whoAEd had seizures. She was told he was stable and to check him in a few minutes, but OAEBryan decided not to wait. She found he had stopped breathing and was turning blue. "If I hadnAEt gone right away, he probably would have died," OAEBryan said. "I couldnAEt do it anymore."

Many novice nurses like OAEBryan are thrown into hospitals with little direct supervision, quickly forced to juggle multiple patients and make critical decisions for the first time in their careers. About 1 in 5 newly licensed nurses quits within a year, according to one national study.

That turnover rate is a major contributor to the nationAEs growing shortage of nurses. But there are expanding efforts to give new nursing grads better support. Many hospitals are trying to create safety nets with residency training programs.

"It really was, aeThrow them out there and let them learn,"AE said University of Portland nursing professor Diane Vines. The university now helps run a yearlong program for new nurses.

"This time around, weAEre a little more humane in our treatment of first-year grads, knowing they might not stay if we donAEt do better," she said.

The national nursing shortage could reach 500,000 by 2025, as many nurses retire and the demand for nurses balloons with the aging of baby boomers, according to Peter Buerhaus of Vanderbilt University Medical Center. The nursing professor is author of a book about the future of the nursing work force.

Nursing schools have been unable to churn out graduates fast enough to keep up with the demand, which is why hospitals are trying harder to retain them.

Medical school grads get on-the-job training during formal residencies ranging from three to seven years. Many newly licensed nurses do not have a similar protected period as they build their skills and get used to a demanding environment. …

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