Love on the Blocks

By Yabroff, Jennie | Newsweek, March 2, 2009 | Go to article overview

Love on the Blocks


Yabroff, Jennie, Newsweek


Byline: Jennie Yabroff

You've gotta have a gimmick to sell a book. We're sold on an auction catalog that's really a novel.

Lenore Doolan met Harold Morris at a Halloween party in 2002. She was dressed as Lizzie Borden in a bloodstained lace blouse, he as Harry Houdini in an evening shirt and handcuffs. They were together for four years. Recently, the detritus of their relationship was sold to the highest bidder by the auction house of Strachan & Quinn. Lots included pictures from the night they met, Scrabble tiles Lenore sent Harold that spelled out THANK YOU, the salt-and-pepper shakers they stole from restaurants and the corks they saved from special bottles of wine. Sorry you missed the auction? Don't be. Strachan & Quinn doesn't really exist. Nor, for that matter, do Lenore and Harold. They are the creation of Leanne Shapton, the writer and artist who created "Important Artifacts and Personal Property From the Collection of Lenore Doolan and Harold Morris, Including Books, Street Fashion, and Jewelry." The book looks exactly like an auction catalog, with photographs and brief yet detailed descriptions of the 332 lots for sale. Think of it as a love story told by a curator, instead of a narrator.

For nearly as long as people have been writing novels, writers have been bumping up against the limitation of black text against a white page to tell the same basic tales: love, loss, death, etc. Laurence Sterne's 1759 proto-modernist novel "The Life and Opinions of Tristram Shandy, Gentleman," includes reproduced legal documents, sermons and one entirely black page, to convey the narrator's despair over the death of his friend (as well as the blankness of death itself). But critics rarely take kindly to these efforts. The New York Times pronounced Vladimir Nabokov's 1962 "Pale Fire," a mystery in the form of an annotated narrative poem, "a curiosity into which it is agreeable to dip rather than a book which can be read straight through with pleasure." "Whenever you have a high-concept thing, it can be seen as a gimmick," Shapton admits. Novels incorporating visual elements by writers such as David Foster Wallace and Jonathan Safran Foer (just to list a few), have received similar criticism: the devices--maps, photographs, charts, drawings, collages--are too clever for their own good. So the question is: do visual doodads convey something that plain old text can't, or when you open one of these books do you hear the percussive sound of the author tap-dancing like mad to disguise the fact he or she actually has nothing interesting to say?

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