Are Hi-Tech Gadgets Turning Our Children into Cabbages? Surveys Say We Are Lonelier Than Ever Before

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), February 25, 2009 | Go to article overview

Are Hi-Tech Gadgets Turning Our Children into Cabbages? Surveys Say We Are Lonelier Than Ever Before


Byline: Sally Williams

CONVERSATION within families could die out as social interaction risks becoming obsolete with the rise of social networking sites and digital devices.

And a failure to interact properly with others could have a damaging effect on a generation of children raised on mobile phones and Bebo, psychologists have warned.

Parents with children of a certain age will be familiar with the growing phenomenon of the mealtime Nintendo DS - and their requests to sit down for dinner being met with a mid-text grunt.

But a failure to converse with children is allowing society to replace human relationships with a reliance on technology.

An academic study published last week found the average age at which a child is given a first mobile phone is now just eight. And children are establishing presences on social networking sites - including Bebo and Facebook - at a frighteningly young age.

A study published yesterday by scientists at Oxford University suggested such sites could leave children suffering from short attention spans, a failure to emotionally relate to other people and self-esteem problems.

The report, led by Lady Greenfield, professor of synaptic pharmacology at Lincoln College, Oxford, prompted the Government to concede its policies on Internet regulation had failed to consider the psychological impact of certain sites on young children.

And yesterday a study of 1,000 mothers, conducted on behalf of insurance company Sheila's Wheels, discovered a propensity to give their children lifts just to secure a rare opportunity to talk to them.

Clinical psychologist Linda Blair, author of self-help manual Straight Talking, said she had heard of parents parking away from the school gate to give themselves further scope for conversation.

"We are just not as good as communicating with each other as we were," she said.

"Our heads are buried in mobiles, laptops and on social networking sites because they are easy distractions, like crossword puzzles, but all the surveys say that we are lonelier than ever before. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Are Hi-Tech Gadgets Turning Our Children into Cabbages? Surveys Say We Are Lonelier Than Ever Before
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.