Chicago BullsAE Legends Kerr, Van Lier

Daily Herald (Arlington Heights, IL), March 1, 2009 | Go to article overview

Chicago BullsAE Legends Kerr, Van Lier


Byline: Associated Press

Johnny "Red" Kerr, the former Chicago Bulls coach who spent more than three decades as a broadcaster for the team, has died. He was 76.

The Bulls unveiled a statue of Kerr at the United Center during an emotional ceremony earlier this month that included taped messages from President Barack Obama and commissioner David Stern and speeches from Scottie Pippen and Michael Jordan.

A Chicago native who served as the teamAEs first head coach and received NBA Coach of the Year honors for leading the Bulls to the playoffs in the inaugural 1966-67 season, Kerr also received a photo collage from Bulls GM John Paxson and the Basketball Hall of FameAEs John W. Bunn Lifetime Achievement Award from Jerry Colangelo during the ceremony.

Kerr played 12 seasons (1954-1966) in the NBA.

Norm Van Lier, one of the most popular players in Chicago Bulls history and one of the NBAAEs top defensive players in the 1970s, was found dead in his home just blocks away from the Bulls arena on Thursday. He was 61.

The Cook County Medical ExaminerAEs office confirmed Van LierAEs death but said a cause was not immediately known.

Van Lier, who most recently worked for Comcast SportsNet Chicago, had been scheduled as a pre- and post-game analyst for Wednesday nightAEs Bulls game with the New Jersey Nets.

Comcast officials became concerned after Van Lier did not show up for work and could not be reached Thursday, so an employee was sent to his apartment and tried to get inside, said Jim Corno, president of Comcast SportsNet Chicago.

Authorities responding to a subsequent well-being check request found Van Lier unresponsive.

Van Lier began his NBA career with Cincinnati in 1969. He later spent more than six seasons with the Chicago Bulls before finishing his career with Milwaukee in 1979.

Philip Jose Farmer, one of the most celebrated science fiction, fantasy and short story writers of the 1960s and AE70s, has died. He was 91.

The longtime Peoria resident wrote more than 75 novels, including the Riverworld and World of Tiers series. He won the Hugo Award three times and the Grand Master Award for Science Fiction in 2001.

FarmerAEs first published story, "The Lovers," caught the attention of the science fiction world in 1952 with one of the genreAEs first serious treatments of sexuality. At the time, he was working full time at a Peoria steel mill and writing on the side.

"The Lovers" was based on a love affair between a man on Earth and an alien woman, and Farmer rocked the science fiction community by dealing with sex in a frank manner. …

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Chicago BullsAE Legends Kerr, Van Lier
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