The Writing Experiences of Room 3: "I Didn't like Writing but I Do Now!"

By Statkus, Philippa | Practically Primary, February 2008 | Go to article overview

The Writing Experiences of Room 3: "I Didn't like Writing but I Do Now!"


Statkus, Philippa, Practically Primary


Introduction

Many children have negative feelings about writing, and I believe that one reason for this is an overemphasis on the form and process of writing. This overemphasis all too often results in the fun of learning to write being lost.

Room 3 and Writing

At the beginning of this term, my Room 3 children used the Three Stars and a Wish formula to evaluate their learning and the classroom experiences. For twenty of the twenty-four children, these evaluations showed 'writing' or 'daily writing' as a star (a positive). I was delighted that their attitudes towards writing seemed to be improving.

When I asked the children why they liked writing so much, I received the following enthusiastic responses:

* It is fun.

* I'm good at it.

* I didn't used to be good at writing but I am now.

* You can write what you want.

* I can write about trucks and then draw them for the story.

* I can write about what I want to write about, not just what I did on the weekend or stuff like that.

* I didn't like writing but I do now.

Writing Experiences that Motivate

It is important to point out that this class is enthusiastic about most things; however, they are notably keen at writing time. If I am to ever forget about or delay daily writing, I am soon reminded that it needs to be done.

In Room 3, the following features of the classroom writing experiences work to sustain the students' enthusiasm.

Daily Journal Writing

During daily journal writing, the children write for a set time on topics that they have chosen themselves. On completion, they edit their own work and some students then share their writing with the class.

No one is ever forced to share as it is my belief that, for some students, the sharing of their writing with others is an uncomfortable experience, and they don't want their personal thoughts and feelings to be heard by everyone. For these children, sharing is encouraged at other times of the day and within other learning experiences. For example, they might be asked to share what they have written in a science report or a Society and Environment investigation.

I have had children reveal their deepest fears and dreams in their writing, knowing that, as the teacher and sole audience for their writing, I will not be judgemental and that their secrets are safe. If children can feel safe, trust the reader, and have no need to fear ridicule, then writing can be a wonderful outlet for them.

Topic Choice

To begin daily writing, the children are asked to share topic ideas. Consequently, those children who do not yet know what to write about have the opportunity to make use of others' suggestions, while the rest of the students can use their chosen topic.

Idea Wall There is section of a classroom wall dedicated to writing ideas. Children who have ideas that they wish to share are encouraged to write them on a post-it note and stick this on the wall. Additionally, the Idea Wall includes pictures from magazines (or hand drawn pictures) that can be used as a source for character development in writing.

Editing

Punctuation, grammar and spelling is obviously important to good writing; however, for children to enjoy writing, they must be given the opportunity to express themselves, to not have their creativity stifled in the initial stages of writing. In Room 3, the children are given time to simply write--and it is only after ideas are expressed that they are required to examine and 'fix up' their work. They do this using a different coloured pen or pencil to show where changes need to be made.

Writing Experiences

Writing experiences were tedious for me when I was at school. Without fail, an excursion, a visitor to the school, or something happening in the classroom, resulted in my class having to recount it in writing. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Writing Experiences of Room 3: "I Didn't like Writing but I Do Now!"
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.