Japan's View of the New China

By Shuja, Sharif M. | Contemporary Review, April 1997 | Go to article overview

Japan's View of the New China


Shuja, Sharif M., Contemporary Review


A metaphor the Chinese use to describe their reform policies, whether economic or political, is crossing the stream by feeling the stones with one's feet. This implies, among other things, that while there is a long-term goal - modernization - the method is certainly not pre-determined. It also explains the policy variations and uncertainties, unless one prefers the monolithic model to view China.

Modernization makes China more powerful, but modernization also requires China's participation in mainstream regional diplomacy, both economic and political. And this, in turn, means Chinese support for preserving and strengthening regional stability. China's contribution to conflict resolution in Indochina and Korea, its involvement in workshops on the South China Sea, and its normalisation of relations with Jakarta, Singapore, Moscow and Seoul are cases in point.

No-one has any doubt that China aims to be the strongest power in Asia by early in the next century. There is little doubt that the single most important state in East Asia is China. China has 68 per cent of East Asian territory and some 65 per cent of the East Asian population. These fundamental bases of power are relatively unchanging. Moreover, pragmatic observers, including the business community in the West and Japan, see the opportunities presented by China. They know that a more open China will benefit the West and Japan. The Clinton Administration's new realism in dealing with China shows that it has recognised America's huge stake in engaging China constructively, on economic, security and strategic issues, instead of trying to isolate it.

It is true that the Chinese are a pragmatic people, and are often seen by other nations as being unpredictable, misunderstood and therefore uncooperative. China often appears to those who do not fully understand it as resembling the odd man out, trying to resist political pressure from the West, submitting to it where it can make a gain, while standing firm when it perceives its sovereignty and national integrity threatened. Due to its unique history, culture and political thought, China has developed certain behavioural characteristics and attitudes which are a puzzle to the West. Hence, China is often regarded by the West and Japan as a problematic state with which to deal. We must discuss the attitudes that China is currently displaying, before examining this enigma through Japan's perspectives. Japan and the West must strengthen a free and open global trading system, to give China a stake in a peaceful world order. Both the West and Japan will lose if China is discouraged, or worse, blocked from integrating with the world economy. For example, limiting China's access to Western markets will slow its growth, but will not prevent it from eventually emerging as a major economic power. When it does, it will not view the West as a friend. Japan and the West must help China integrate with the world economy if they want China's support in preserving a peaceful world order.

In recent years, Beijing has found its vital interests increasingly tied to the Asia-Pacific region. In Beijing's calculations, China, with a population of 1.1 billion people and as a permanent member of the UN Security Council, will eventually carry greater weight in future international relations. Beijing well understands that China's influence and impact are more appreciated in this region than anywhere else. While some countries in this region may not trust China, neither do they want to see a power vacuum open to possible Japanese hegemony. In addition, as China's foreign minister found, 'The Asia-Pacific region is comparatively stable and East Asia is the most dynamic region in the world economy.' In response to the worldwide trend toward forming regional economic and trade blocs, if Beijing exerts great influence on major players in this region and skillfully manoeuvres the regional cooperative efforts such as the Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC), China, it is believed, may gain the cooperation of Japan and other countries and eventually become the leader of this dynamic region. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Japan's View of the New China
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.