Reject Freeman 'For Good of the Country'

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 8, 2009 | Go to article overview

Reject Freeman 'For Good of the Country'


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Congressman Frank R. Wolf of Virginia has sent a letter to President Obama, a copy of which The Washington Times obtained exclusively, that expresses his deep concern regarding the appointment of Chas W. Freeman Jr. as chairman of the National Intelligence Council. Rep. Wolf noted as particularly disturbing Freeman's service on the board of the China National Offshore Oil Cooperative (CNOOC), the majority stakeholder of which is the communist government of China.

Wolf stated that China poses an increasing national security threat to the United States and noted that in 2006 four computers in his office were hacked by attacks originating in the People's Republic of China.

Wolf, who is co-chair of the Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission, also noted Freeman's flippant characterization of March 2008 protests in Tibet as a race riot and drew attention to CNOOC's substantial investment in Sudan's oil sector, which has served as the lifeline to the regime of President Omar al Bashir, now indicted by the International Criminal Court for war crimes and crimes against humanity. He also highlights CNOOC connections with Iran and Burma, noting that the activities of these countries, and Iran in particular, starkly contrast with the national security interests of the United States.

Freeman has for many years served in a paid position as president of the Middle East Policy Council, an organization that has kept its donor list secret but which Wolf notes is a think-tank funded by Saudi Arabia. He asks how Freeman can be expected to effectively meet the challenge of Wahabbist inspired radicalism after taking home years of paychecks from the Saudis.

Wolf concludes that the evidence strongly suggests that Freeman is not the right person to head the National Intelligence Council and that for the good of our country President Obama should reconsider his choice. In a hand-written addendum Mr. Wolf states, THIS IS VERY IMPORTANT. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Reject Freeman 'For Good of the Country'
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Full screen

matching results for page

Cited passage

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

"Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited passage

Welcome to the new Questia Reader

The Questia Reader has been updated to provide you with an even better online reading experience.  It is now 100% Responsive, which means you can read our books and articles on any sized device you wish.  All of your favorite tools like notes, highlights, and citations are still here, but the way you select text has been updated to be easier to use, especially on touchscreen devices.  Here's how:

1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
2. Click or tap the last word you want to select.

OK, got it!

Thanks for trying Questia!

Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

Already a member? Log in now.